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Sleepover at IKEA: dozens stranded amid snowstorm in Denmark

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Two dozen staff and six customers were forced to stay the night at IKEA as up to 30 centimetres of snow trapped them inside

A furniture showroom in the department store in Aalborg, Denmark, became the bedroom of several people who were unable to safely make it home in time amidst a strong snowstorm.

Store Manager Peter Elmose told the Ekstra Bladet tabloid that people could “pick the exact bed they always have wanted to try.”

People working in a toy shop next door also took to the department store to join in on the fun.

Michelle Barrett, one of the toy shop staff, told Denmark’s public broadcaster, DR, “it’s much better than sleeping in one’s car. It has been nice and warm and we are just happy that they would let us in.” 

“We just laughed at the situation, because we will probably not experience it again,” she added.

Another approximate 300 people had to stay the night at the Aalborg airport to keep out of the storm. 

According to Euronews, the IKEA sleepover consisted of feasting on chips and Swedish cinnamon rolls in the staff canteen before watching television.

“It was a really nice evening, enjoying each other’s company,” Elmose told AFP. 

“Everyone had a full night’s sleep, our mattresses are good.”

And when the shop reopened for business the next morning, all the bedding and sheets had of course been changed.

Unmade beds following the overnight stay at IKEA amid snowstorm. Source: IKEA Aalborg’s Instagram

This comes after 61 people were trapped in a Yorkshire pub for three nights last week.

The several people trapped in the Tan Hill Inn during the storm slept on makeshift beds on the floor, watched movies, had a quiz night and enjoyed a buffet meal.

Some guests even claimed they didn’t want to leave the the pub after enjoying the 17th century hotel’s hospitality.

Business

Why Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport will cap passenger departures

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Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport is capping the number of departures until next year

The airport says airlines “are not happy about it” but ultimately had no choice.

It follows a string of airport chaos over the busy summer period in The Netherlands and Europe more broadly.

Caps are expected to extend through the end of March. But authorities will review the situation again towards the end of this year.

The aviation business continues to be plagued by labor shortages on the back of the pandemic.

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Food delivery drone crashes into powerlines

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Thousands of people have been left without power after a food delivery drone crashed into powerlines

Power was restored after 45 minutes after the drone made a pre-cautionary landing.

‘Wing’ is the company behind the incident who use drones for their food delivery services.

A spokesperson for Energex, the company who supplies power to the 300-affected homes says drones can be dangerous.

It’s believed these instances are very rare and the meal was still hot when emergency crews arrived at the scene.

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Huge win for millions caught up in Optus data breach

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Major news for those impacted by the Optus data incident, with authorities working around the clock to get to the bottom of the saga

Is this a sigh of relief for Optus customers?

It is a major win for those who have been impacted by the massive Optus data breach.

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has confirmed the telco giant will cover the costs of replacing affected customers’ passports, a move he has labeled as entirely appropriate.

The hacker released the personal details of more than 10,000 people on an online forum, before removing the post.

This is evidently a costly move for Optus, but one which many Australians have been calling for.

On the other side of the coin, it will also be a massive undertaking for the nation’s passport office which has been slammed recently as Aussies head back overseas post-Covid.

This comes as the Australian Federal Police launches an operation to support the data breach victims.

AFP Assistant Commissioner Justine Gough says affected customers will receive “multi-layered protection from identity crime and financial fraud”.

As the investigation continues, Australian authorities will also be leaning on their international counterparts for assistance, including America’s FBI.

It’s a massive operation and one that many Australians and indeed people right around the world are watching closely.

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