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Lyft, Uber in the driver’s seat in fight against Texas anti-abortion laws

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Those working for rideshare companies across Texas and surrounds are now protected under new driver defense fund.

Lyft, Uber fighting back against anti-abortion laws

Rideshare companies are set to cover legal costs for drivers who are sued under a controversial Texas anti-abortion law.

Lyft and Uber announced they’ll take responsibility for any form of punishment drivers encounter under a new rule which threatens drivers for taking passengers where they need to go.

The rule specifically focuses on those driving female passengers to medical clinics for pregnancy-termination purposes.

Both transportation services believe passengers are entitled to not disclosing their reasons for travel, especially those exercising their right to choose and access the healthcare they need.

A passenger’s destination is not a driver’s responsibility

Lyft also says a passenger’s reason for travel is not a driver’s responsibility.

“Imagine being a driver and not knowing if you are breaking the law by giving someone a ride,” Lyft co-founders Logan and John say.

“[Also] imagine being a pregnant woman trying to get to a healthcare appointment and not knowing if your driver will cancel on you for fear of breaking the law.”

In response to the mandate, Lyft has created a Driver Legal Defense Fund to cover 100 percent of legal fees sued under the SB8 rule.

Additionally, Lyft is donating $1 million to Planned Parenthood to help ensure that transportation is never a barrier to healthcare access.

Butting heads with Texas

Texas’ new law, signed this week, prohibits abortions after six weeks of pregnancy

The law also empowers private citizens across the country to sue anyone for aiding abortions past that six-week mark, that includes medical clinics and those who drive women to them.

The announcements from Uber and Lyft come after Bumble and Tinder announced the creation of a relief fund for women seeking abortions.

Written by Rebecca Borg

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Why the meme-stock frenzy is unlikely to repeat

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GME shares surge 74%, but experts stress a meme-stock frenzy resurgence is unlikely due to fundamental differences in the company’s financial situation.

Australia’s budget unveils a second consecutive surplus of A$9.3 billion, prioritising the critical minerals industry and green energy initiatives to reduce reliance on Chinese supply.

Also, GameStop shares have surged 74%, but experts caution against expecting a repeat of the 2021 meme-stock frenzy. #featured #trending

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Why are airlines after the Biden Administration?

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Major airlines are taking legal action against the Biden administration over a newly implemented rule requiring them to disclose fees upfront.

On this episode of Hot Shots – Major airlines are suing the Biden Administration, AI-piloted fighter jets, SpaceX faces funding challenges, and Apple receives crushing feedback.

Ticker’s Ahron Young & Veronica Dudo discuss. #featured #trending

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The mounting pressure on Government spends

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Questions abound regarding the factors fueling this inflation surge in Australia and whether it correlates with the escalating government expenditures.

Concerns extend to how Chalmers navigates the mounting pressure amid discrepancies in spending allocations.

Moreover, as Australians grapple with the reality of rising living costs, the feasibility of cutting spending becomes a pressing issue. Additionally, amidst economic uncertainties, individuals seek guidance on managing stock market risks effectively. #Featured #Trending

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