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Nancy Pelosi meets with Taiwanese President

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U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi meets with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen

U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s meets with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-web as tensions with China soar.

Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan has created a storm of controversy, and captivated the world’s attention.

The third highest-ranking American official is leading a Congressional delegation on a tour of the Indo-Pacific.

Pelosi has scheduled stops in Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea and Japan.

But it’s the unannounced visit to Taiwan— the independently governed Island—that’s stealing the spotlight.

Word of Pelosi’s trip did not sit well with China, as Beijing views Taiwan as part of its territory.

China considers any trip by a high-ranking American official as confirmation of U.S. support for the Island’s independence.

The U.S. does not have official relations with Taiwan — also known as the Republic of China — and maintains a One China Policy.

This policy recognises the People’s Republic of China as the legitimate successor nation.

However, America has been stepping up engagement with the Island as China seeks to isolate it from global institutions.

Shortly after Pelosi touched down, the Taiwan Bureau of Foreign Trade confirmed China  suspended imports from Taiwanese companies. 

The companies produce pastries, baked goods and sweets and the suspension appears to be a retaliatory policy meant to put pressure on the island.

The Chinese military posted a propaganda video of its troops launching missiles, grabbing weapons, and taking off in fighter jets ahead of the Speaker’s visit to the region.

Back in Washington, the Pentagon’s John Kirby said Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan doesn’t violate any sovereignty issues.

Veronica Dudo is the U.S. Correspondent for Ticker News covering America’s biggest headlines. As an Emmy® Award nominated global journalist, Veronica has traveled across the country and around the world reporting on historical events that connect all citizens. Lauded as an award-winning international journalist, Veronica has executed stellar news coverage for NBC News, CBS News, The Hill, ME-TV Network and AOL. Her stories have highlighted a plethora of topics ranging from breaking news and politics to economic affairs across the USA, European Union, and Asia; cultural affairs; globalization; governance; education; and sustainability.

World

Woman slapped with 34 years in jail for tweeting

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A Saudi Women’s rights campaigner, has been sentenced to 34 years in jail for tweeting

33 year old Salma al-Shehab has been charged with disrupting “public order” and undermining “the safety of the general public and stability of the state.”

According to some reports, she did not make her own tweet, but was following & retweeting accounts critical of Saudi Arabia.

She has been sentenced to 34 years in prison, followed by a 34 year travel ban.

The United States is now studying the case to determine its validity and fairness.

“Exercising freedom of expression to advocate for the rights of women should not be criminalised, it should never be criminalised.”

State Department spokesperson Ned Price told reporters

Al-Shehab was a student at Leeds University in the UK, when she was arrested in 2021.

She says she has been subject to solitary confinement and the investigation has kept her from contact with her two young children.

Her sister, an activist as well, says this is a “mockery of the Saudi authorities claims of reforms for women”, adding “they remain hellbent on harshly punishing anyone who expresses their opinions.”

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Climate Change

Chinese planes shoot rods into the sky

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In a fight against the effects of climate change, China has begun cloud seeding

China is seeding clouds in its famous Yangtze River, in an attempt to fight the drought.

Planes have been shooting silver iodide rods into the sky, to trigger more rainfall.

Because of crippling climate change, and record heatwaves, the river had completely dried up in parts.

The Ministry of Water resources says the dry spell in the river is “adversely affecting drinking water security of rural people,” livestock and crops.

Photo Credit: SMH

The pen-sized rods work by forming ice crystals in existing clouds to produce more rain.

Cloud seeding is a common practice in the country but some experts are concerned about its unnatural impact on the earths atmosphere.

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World

Former chief financial officer expected to plead guilty to 15-year tax fraud scheme

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The former chief financial officer of the Trump Organisation is expected to plead guilty to tax fraud

Allen Weisselberg is a long-time ally of Trump and is in talks to plead to the indictment.

Facing up to 15 years in prison, this new deal will see the former CFO to instead receive a five year sentence and to serve just 100 days behind bars.

Weisselberg will not sign up as a cooperator to the 15-year tax fraud scheme, but will testify at trial.

The Trump Organisation has been charged with 10 counts and Weisselberg with 15.

It all relates back to an alleged scheme in 2005, wherby Trump executives were compensated ‘off the books.’

Prosecutors allege the former CFO failed to pay taxes on $1.7 million in income.

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