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Concerns for Press Freedoms as Apple Daily announces closure date

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Hong Kong’s pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily will stop operating on Thursday

The tabloid’s parent company, Next Digital said confirmed the news after national security police arrested another employee of the troubled newspaper.

The recent events bring the 26 year operations of the popular tabloid to a close.

Apple Daily is popular within Hong Kong. The newspaper, which mixes pro-democracy discourse with racy celebrity gossip and investigations of those in power, has escalated alarm over media freedom and other rights in the Chinese-ruled city.

In a statement on its website, Next Digital stated that the decision to close the newspaper, which employs about 600 journalists, was taken “due to the current circumstances prevailing in Hong Kong.”

Last weeek authorities in Hong Kong froze assets of companies linked to the newspaper and arrested five executives.

On Wednesday, it arrested a columnist on suspicion of conspiring to collude with a foreign country or foreign forces.

Authorities have revealed their concern over dozens of Apple Daily pieces that may have violated the security law, the first instance of authorities taking aim at media articles under the legislation.

There has now been an outcry from rights groups, media organisations and Western governments, who have criticised last week’s raid of the Apple Daily newsroom. Those who state press freedom has been violated.

The Apple Daily has come under increasing pressure following the arrest of its since tycoon owner and Beijing critic, Jimmy Lai.

Anthony Lucas is reporter, presenter and social media producer with ticker News. Anthony holds a Bachelor of Professional Communication, with a major in Journalism from RMIT University as well as a Diploma of Arts and Entertainment journalism from Collarts. He’s previously worked for 9 News, ONE FM Radio and Southern Cross Austerio’s Hit Radio Network. 

Business

Big tech stocks tumble amid market uncertainty

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Big tech companies are struggling in the markets this quarter as interest rates rise to battle inflation

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has devalued tech stocks causing further supply chain disruptions and sending the broad S&P 500 index down about 5 per cent.

Rising interest rates triggered more severe plummets with the S&P dropping another 16 per cent and the Nasdaq Composite index by 22 per cent.

Tesla’s stock took a huge hit sinking to nearly 38 per cent its largest decline since 2010.

Amazon saw similar results falling by 35 per cent the most in over 20 years.

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Business

Google to pay millions to app developers

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App developers are accusing Google of tempting users into making in-app purchases.

The lawsuit relates to money that was made by app creators for Android smartphones.

The lawsuit was filed in a San Francisco court, where the 48,000 app developers are believed to have been affected.

“Following our win against Apple for similar conduct, we think this pair of settlements sends a strong message to big tech: the law is watching, and even the most powerful companies in the world are accountable when they stifle competition.”

Steve Berman, ATTORNEY FOR the Android developers.

Google says the settlement’s funds will support developers who have made less than USD $2 million in revenue between 2016 and 2021.

“A vast majority of U.S. developers who earned revenue through Google Play will be eligible to receive money from this fund, if they choose,” the company says.

Google says it will charge developers a 15 per cent commission on their first million in revenue.

The court is yet to approve the proposed settlement.

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Business

Tesla deliveries expected to fall – here’s why

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Tesla deliveries are expected to drop significantly in the second quarter, as prolonged Covid lockdowns in China and supply chain issues take their toll

The company is also struggling to ramp up its new factories, with Tesla boss Elon Musk seemingly distracted by his very public pursuit of Twitter.

Tesla has been plagued by production glitches in China and slow output growth at new factories in both Texas and Berlin.

Experts predict deliveries will slump to just over 295,000 vehicles for the second quarter.

This would be down from the company’s record of 310,000 in the preceding quarter, marking Tesla’s first quarter-on-quarter decline since 2020.

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