Connect with us
https://tickernews.co/wp-content/uploads/2023/10/AmEx-Thought-Leaders.jpg

News

China accuses Australia of “hypocritical” Microsoft hack accusations

Published

on

China has responded to claims that it was responsible for a hack on Microsoft’s email software

China has lashed out at Australia, accusing the nation of ‘hypocrisy over the Federal Government’s accusation that the communist nation was responsible for a major hack on Microsoft email software.

In a statement from the Chinese Embassy, China firmly rejected the “groundless” accusations made by the Australian government on cyber issues, following the steps and parroting the rhetoric of the US.

Australia along with the US’s Biden Administration has pointed fingers at China over the hacking, stating that China’s Ministry of State Security is responsible for the cyber attack.

“is well known that the US has engaged in unscrupulous, massive and indiscriminate eavesdropping on many countries including its allies.”

China says

China’s embassy in Canberra, Australia issued a statement declaring the accusation was ‘false’:

“It is the world champion of malicious cyber attacks. Australia also has a poor record, including monitoring the mobile phone of the president of its biggest neighbor country, not to mention acting as an accomplice for the US’ eavesdropping activities under the framework of Five Eyes alliance.

“What the Australian government has done is extremely hypocritical, like a thief crying “stop the thief”.”

“As a victim of cyber attacks, China always firmly opposes cyber attacks and cyber theft in all forms and calls on countries to advance dialogue and cooperation to safeguard cybersecurity. China put forward the Global Initiative on Data Security last September, and hopes that all countries will respond positively to jointly foster a peaceful, secure, open and cooperative cyberspace if they genuinely care about cybersecurity.”

The Biden administration also blamed China for the hack

The hack compromised tens of thousands of computers around the world earlier this year. The administration and allied nations have also disclosed a broad range of other cyberthreats from Beijing.

Of those threats includes ransomware attacks from government-affiliated hackers that have targeted companies with demands for millions of dollars.

According to a senior Biden administration official, hackers affiliated with China’s Ministry of State Security conducted the operation, which took advantage of security flaws in Microsoft Exchange Server software – or Microsoft’s email software. 

Anthony Lucas is reporter, presenter and social media producer with ticker News. Anthony holds a Bachelor of Professional Communication, with a major in Journalism from RMIT University as well as a Diploma of Arts and Entertainment journalism from Collarts. He’s previously worked for 9 News, ONE FM Radio and Southern Cross Austerio’s Hit Radio Network. 

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

Investors assess geopolitical risks amidst tensions

Published

on

Amidst a backdrop of geopolitical easing, investors are reassessing their risk strategies to navigate a more tranquil global landscape.

This shift coincides with markets recalibrating expectations around potential rate cuts, resulting in a downturn in stocks.

In the tech sector, all eyes are on US earnings reports this week, particularly those of industry giants whose performance often sets the tone for market sentiment.

Additionally, anticipation mounts ahead of the release of Australian CPI data, scheduled for Wednesday, which promises insights into economic health and potential monetary policy implications.

These developments underscore the need for investors to remain vigilant and adaptable in response to evolving geopolitical and economic dynamics.

Continue Reading

News

Building the financial foundations for every decade

Published

on

Navigating financial milestones: strategies for success in your 20s, 30s, and beyond

Your 20s mark the beginning of your financial journey, and building sustainable cash flow habits is paramount. Start by tackling high-interest debts like credit cards and Afterpay systematically. Allocate at least 10% of your income to savings and automate it into high-interest investments. Be intentional with your budget, understanding how each expense serves you.

As you transition into your 30s, family and homeownership become significant commitments. Approach these decisions thoughtfully, considering affordability and lifestyle implications. Develop a strategy to pay off your home loan swiftly, regularly reviewing your interest rate and payment options.

In your 40s, focus shifts to superannuation, maximising concessional contributions for tax efficiency. Ensure your investments are managed by reputable professionals with the right asset allocation. Invest in properties with strong cash flow and growth potential to secure your financial future.

Each stage of life presents unique financial opportunities and challenges.

By following these guidelines, you can lay a solid foundation for wealth creation and security throughout your lifetime.

Continue Reading

News

U.S. House passes $95 billion Ukraine, Israel aid package

Published

on

The U.S. House of Representatives on Saturday with broad bipartisan support passed a $95 billion legislative package providing security assistance to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, over bitter objections from Republican hardliners.

The legislation now proceeds to the Democratic-majority Senate, which passed a similar measure more than two months ago.
U.S. leaders from Democratic President Joe Biden to top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell had been urging embattled Republican House Speaker Mike Johnson to bring it up for a vote.
Advertisement · Scroll to continue

The Senate is set to begin considering the House-passed bill on Tuesday, with some preliminary votes that afternoon. Final passage was expected sometime next week, which would clear the way for Biden to sign it into law.

The bills provide $60.84 billion to address the conflict in Ukraine, including $23 billion to replenish U.S. weapons, stocks and facilities; $26 billion for Israel, including $9.1 billion for humanitarian needs, and $8.12 billion for the Indo-Pacific, including Taiwan.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy expressed his thanks, saying U.S. lawmakers moved to keep “history on the right track.”

“The vital U.S. aid bill passed today by the House will keep the war from expanding, save thousands and thousands of lives, and help both of our nations to become stronger,” Zelenskiy said on X.

It was unclear how quickly the new military funding for Ukraine will be depleted, likely causing calls for further action by Congress.

Biden, who had urged Congress since last year to approve the additional aid to Ukraine, said in a statement: “It comes at a moment of grave urgency, with Israel facing unprecedented attacks from Iran and Ukraine under continued bombardment from Russia.”

The vote on passage of the Ukraine funding was 311-112. Significantly, 112 Republicans opposed the legislation, with only 101 in support.

“Mike Johnson is a lame duck … he’s done,” far-right Republican Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene told reporters afterward.

She has been a leading opponent of helping Ukraine in its war against Russia and has taken steps that threaten to remove Johnson from office over this issue. Greene stopped short of doing so on Saturday, however.

During the vote, several lawmakers waved small Ukrainian flags as it became clear that element of the package was headed to passage. Johnson warned lawmakers that was a “violation of decorum.”

Meanwhile, the House’s actions during a rare Saturday session put on display some cracks in what generally is solid support for Israel within Congress. Recent months have seen progressive Democrats express anger with Israel’s government and its conduct of the war in Gaza.

Continue Reading
Live Watch Ticker News Live
Advertisement

Trending Now

Copyright © 2024 The Ticker Company