Connect with us

Business

Will Indonesia’s ‘Work From Bali’ save the island? | TICKER VIEWS

Published

on

Indonesia is launching the ‘Work From Bali’ program to revive the Island’s battered economy – but will it go far enough?

The Indonesian Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy has announced their upcoming ‘Work From Bali’ scheme, which will allow public servants to live and work in Nusa Dua. The program will send 25 per cent of Indonesian public servants from seven different Indonesian ministries to live and work from hotels in Nusa Dua. This comes in an effort to boost tourism on the island.

“We hope that with the arrival of government and state-owned company employees, the gears of Bali’s economy will start moving.”

Hermin Esti Setyowati, ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy
Nusa Dua is an island resort in Bali, indonesia.

As Bali suffers, does ‘Work From Bali’ go far enough?

The COVID pandemic hasn’t been easy for any of us, but it’s been tougher on Bali than most. International travel bans brought tourism in Bali to a jarring halt.

Official figures released by the Indonesian government suggest over 80% of Balinese locals have been impacted as a result of the island’s COVID tourism slump.

The tourism industry is crucial to Bali’s economy, with many locals relying on international guests for income. In 2019, 6.3 million international tourists visited the island. In 2020, that number dropped to about 1 million.

This year, the island welcomed just 25 foreigners from January to March. Last year 1.1 million tourists visited the island in the same period. The pandemic has seen more than 4.3 million Balinese people out of work.

Kuta’s streets were once bustling with tourists. Now, they’re unrecognisable.

Will the scheme help the people who need it?

Australian expat Amanda runs the ‘Let’s Help Bali’ Facebook group, which has almost 14,000 members. She explains that many Balinese locals leave their villages to get jobs in tourism, which are more often than not in the city.

“This means the impact doesn’t just affect that immediate person but the whole family who rely on that income,” she told Ticker NEWS.

Amanda says she thinks the scheme “will help very few people”, and the Indonesian government needs to reopen Bali’s borders to support locals in a meaningful way.

“Until the borders are open, I don’t see much changing here,” she said.

“Bali needs help from everywhere”

While support for the program isn’t universal, it appears as though everyone can agree that Bali is suffering. Ketut Ardana, Vice Chairman of the Bali Tourism Board, says the Work From Bali program is a step in the right direction, it doesn’t go far enough.

Health risks of COVID

Despite these efforts to reopen Bali to tourists, COVID remains an issue on the island with almost 2 million total cases, and over 500 active cases.

Nusa Dua is one of Indonesia’s three “green zones,” where the vaccination roll-out has been prioritised. Local newspapers have reported more than 8,000 staff in Nusa Dua, have received a second dose of the vaccine.

Ketut Ardana says he’s “not worried” about the potential health risks of opening borders for travel.

“We are ready and safe to receive tourists,” he said.

Natasha is an Associate Producer at ticker NEWS with a Bachelor of arts from Monash University. She has previously worked at Sky News Australia and Monash University as an Online Content Producer.

Business

Big tech stocks tumble amid market uncertainty

Published

on

Big tech companies are struggling in the markets this quarter as interest rates rise to battle inflation

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has devalued tech stocks causing further supply chain disruptions and sending the broad S&P 500 index down about 5 per cent.

Rising interest rates triggered more severe plummets with the S&P dropping another 16 per cent and the Nasdaq Composite index by 22 per cent.

Tesla’s stock took a huge hit sinking to nearly 38 per cent its largest decline since 2010.

Amazon saw similar results falling by 35 per cent the most in over 20 years.

Continue Reading

Business

Google to pay millions to app developers

Published

on

App developers are accusing Google of tempting users into making in-app purchases.

The lawsuit relates to money that was made by app creators for Android smartphones.

The lawsuit was filed in a San Francisco court, where the 48,000 app developers are believed to have been affected.

“Following our win against Apple for similar conduct, we think this pair of settlements sends a strong message to big tech: the law is watching, and even the most powerful companies in the world are accountable when they stifle competition.”

Steve Berman, ATTORNEY FOR the Android developers.

Google says the settlement’s funds will support developers who have made less than USD $2 million in revenue between 2016 and 2021.

“A vast majority of U.S. developers who earned revenue through Google Play will be eligible to receive money from this fund, if they choose,” the company says.

Google says it will charge developers a 15 per cent commission on their first million in revenue.

The court is yet to approve the proposed settlement.

Continue Reading

Business

Tesla deliveries expected to fall – here’s why

Published

on

Tesla deliveries are expected to drop significantly in the second quarter, as prolonged Covid lockdowns in China and supply chain issues take their toll

The company is also struggling to ramp up its new factories, with Tesla boss Elon Musk seemingly distracted by his very public pursuit of Twitter.

Tesla has been plagued by production glitches in China and slow output growth at new factories in both Texas and Berlin.

Experts predict deliveries will slump to just over 295,000 vehicles for the second quarter.

This would be down from the company’s record of 310,000 in the preceding quarter, marking Tesla’s first quarter-on-quarter decline since 2020.

Continue Reading

Trending on Ticker

Copyright © 2022 The Ticker Company PTY LTD