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U.S. reports first death from monkeypox

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Texas confirms an adult diagnosed with monkeypox has died in what’s believed to be the nation’s first recorded fatality

Health officials in Texas are investigating what appears to be the first death linked to an individual with a confirmed case of monkeypox.

On Tuesday, an adult diagnosed with monkeypox died. However, officials say the individual had a severely compromised immune system.

Currently, health officials are still investigating what role monkeypox played in the person’s death.

While monkeypox is generally non-life threatening, people with compromised immune systems are considered “higher risk” of severe disease.

The U.S. is dealing with the largest monkeypox outbreak in the world right now, with more than 18,000 cases reported across the country.

According to CDC data, infections have been confirmed in every single state as well as Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C.

As the U.S. battles this outbreak, health officials are hoping to contain it through the administration of vaccines, expanded testing, distribution of antiviral treatments, and education for gay and bisexual men about the virus.

“People with monkeypox may first develop symptoms including a flu-like illness with fever, headache, muscle aches, exhaustion and enlarged lymph nodes followed by a rash,” explains Dr. Demetre Daskalalakis, Director of the CDC’s Division of HIV Prevention.

“In recent cases, patients have developed localized rashes on or near the genitals or anus without prior flu-like symptoms,” he added.

“Anyone—regardless of gender or sexual orientation—can develop and spread monkeypox. Many of those affected in the current global outbreaks identify as gay or bisexual men. However, the current risk of exposure to monkeypox is not exclusive to gay and bisexual men in the United States,” he said.

Veronica Dudo is the U.S. Correspondent for Ticker News covering America’s biggest headlines. As an Emmy® Award nominated global journalist, Veronica has traveled across the country and around the world reporting on historical events that connect all citizens. Lauded as an award-winning international journalist, Veronica has executed stellar news coverage for NBC News, CBS News, The Hill, ME-TV Network and AOL. Her stories have highlighted a plethora of topics ranging from breaking news and politics to economic affairs across the USA, European Union, and Asia; cultural affairs; globalization; governance; education; and sustainability.

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Business

New York Stock Exchange in free fall

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Human error sends the New York Stock Exchange tumbling

We’ve all made mistakes at the office from time to time, but spare a thought for one worker who may have single-handedly brought down the New York Stock Exchange with just one tiny error.

The mistake of one employee has wiped billions of dollars off the charts for some of the globe’s largest companies.

The individual reportedly triggered wild swings and volatility on the New York Stock Exchange.

A number of big brand names were caught up in the catastrophe. It included McDonald’s, Walmart, and Mobil.

The NYSE eventually came clean. Officials admitted the“root cause” of the screw-up was a “manual error” from a staff member in the backup data centre.

The employee accidentally left the system running.

That’s why some stocks behaved as if trading had already started, with no opening prices being set, sending the market into a meltdown. #trending #featured

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Sport

Bombshell pro-Russian video emerges from Australian Open

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A bombshell video has emerged of the father of tennis star Novak Djokovic, amplifying the Russian controversy the Australian Open

 
Djokovic’s father was seen posing for pictures with a group of Putin supporters after his son won against Russia’s Andrey Rublev, to qualify for his 10th semi-final.

Russian flags have been banned from the Australian Open, but that didn’t stop one fan.

A man was seen holding a Russian flag with Putin’s face on it and wearing a t-shirt with the pro-war ‘Z’ symbol on it.

Four spectators were questioned by police and evicted from Melbourne Park.

After losing her semi-final, Belarusian Viktoria Azarenka hit back at media when pressed on tennis’ relationship with Russia’s war on Ukraine.

She told reporters incidents like Novak’s father posing with Russian fans have nothing to do with players.

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World

FBI Director discusses classified documents as U.S. lawmakers demand answers

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Bipartisan outrage on Capitol Hill as politicians say the Biden administration is stonewalling their quest for answers

FBI Director Christopher Wray is speaking out for the first time after several batches of classified documents were discovered in U.S. President Joe Biden’s Wilmington home and Washington think tank office.

On Thursday, Wray urged lawmakers and officials to be “conscious of the rules” when dealing with classified documents.

The statements appear to be a veiled criticism of President Biden after news broke that some of the classified papers in the President’s possession date back 14-years ago to when Biden was a Delaware Senator raising questions if this is a pattern for the president to mishandle classified information.

Meanwhile, on Capitol Hill, there is bipartisan outrage as lawmakers say the Biden administration is stonewalling them in their quest for answers.

Currently, both Biden and former President Donald Trump are facing special counsel investigations into their mishandling of classified documents—and just this week, former Vice President Mike Pence turned over classified documents to the DOJ.

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