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TikTok executive falls short on China questions

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TikTok’s Chief Operating Officer has faced questions over whether or not the company hands data to China

Vanessa Pappas has become the first TikTok executive to answer questions from lawmakers about the company’s alleged ties to Beijing.

Pappas was facing members of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

U.S. officials asked whether TikTok shares data with the Chinese Government. But Pappas was unable to confirm whether the company shares data, and if it can cut off its information-sharing.

“ByteDance is founded in China, but we do not have an official headquarters as a global company,” she said.

TikTok is owned by ByteDance, which is based in China.

The popular video-sharing platform has faced a series of probes by U.S. authorities, including by former President Donald Trump who placed an executive order to limit unspecified “transactions” with the Chinese owners of the app.

“I’m concerned that you’re not able to answer the question, except to say that you will not make the commitment to cutting off this data to China,” Senator Rob Portman said during the hearing.

“We also have very strict access controls around the type of data that they can access and where that data is stored, which is here in the United States. And we’ve also said under no circumstances would we give that data to China.”

VANESSA PAPPAS, TIKTKOK CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

The executive maintained the Chinese Government “in no way, shape or form—period” has control over TikTok’s corporate policies.

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New York Stock Exchange in free fall

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Human error sends the New York Stock Exchange tumbling

We’ve all made mistakes at the office from time to time, but spare a thought for one worker who may have single-handedly brought down the New York Stock Exchange with just one tiny error.

The mistake of one employee has wiped billions of dollars off the charts for some of the globe’s largest companies.

The individual reportedly triggered wild swings and volatility on the New York Stock Exchange.

A number of big brand names were caught up in the catastrophe. It included McDonald’s, Walmart, and Mobil.

The NYSE eventually came clean. Officials admitted the“root cause” of the screw-up was a “manual error” from a staff member in the backup data centre.

The employee accidentally left the system running.

That’s why some stocks behaved as if trading had already started, with no opening prices being set, sending the market into a meltdown. #trending #featured

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Toyota announce Koji Sato as new CEO

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He’s the grandson of the founder, and a true titan of the industry.

 
But the question of who should replace Akio Toyoda at the top of Toyota had become a growing concern.

Now we have the answer.

The auto giant has announce its veteran boss would step down as chief executive, and become chairman.

Toyoda said he would be succeeded by chief branding officer Koji Sato from the start of April.

Sato says he loves making cars, and hopes to propel the company further down the Electric Vehicle path over the coming years. #Toyota

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Taylor Swift ticketing fiasco enters the U.S. Senate

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Live Nation is in the firing line over its inability to stop scalper bots from purchasing Taylor Swift tickets

U.S. Senators have grilled the boss of Live Nation over the lack of transparency relating to concert tickets for Taylor Swift’s upcoming tour.

The entertainment company, which owns Ticketmaster is under fire after bots purchased tickets for Swift’s ‘Era Tour’ last year, in an attempt to resell them for a higher price.

Joe Berchtold is the chief financial officer of Live Nation, who apologised to the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.

“We apologise to the fans, we apologise to Ms. Swift, we need to do better and we will do better.”

Senators criticised Live Nation’s fee structure and inability to deal with bots, which bulk buy tickets and resell them at inflated prices.

“There isn’t transparency when no one knows who sets the fees,” Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar said.

Meanwhile, Republican Senator Marsha Blackburn called Live Nation’s bot problem “unbelievable”.

Ticketmaster reportedly occupies more than 70 per cent market share of primary ticket services for major U.S. concert venues.

“You ought to be able to get some good advice from people and figure it out,” Ms Blackburn said.

Ticketmaster cancelled sales of Swift’s tour to the public because of the “high demand”.

The entertainment giant reportedly sold over 2 million tickets, which is enough to fill 900 stadiums.

Taylor Swift said the situation was difficult, and called for accountability for music promoters.

“It’s really difficult for me to trust an outside entity with these relationships and loyalties, and excruciating for me to just watch mistakes happen with no recourse.

“I’m not going to make excuses for anyone because we asked them, multiple times, if they could handle this kind of demand and we were assured they could,” she said.

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