Connect with us
https://tickernews.co/wp-content/uploads/2023/10/AmEx-Thought-Leaders.jpg

Tech

Tech giants forced to hand over anti-abuse processes

Published

on

Australia’s e-Safety Commissioner is demanding tech giants hand over their anti-abuse processes, in a bid to tackle dangerous material

Australia’s e-Safety Commissioner has demanded major digital tech platforms Meta, Apple, and Microsoft share their processes, to eradicate the sharing of child abuse material on their platforms.

The warning comes amid growing concerns of abusive and potentially dangerous material online. If the tech giants fail to hand over the details, they will face hefty fines for non-compliance.

Meta, Apple and Microsoft have been reminded that they each face a fine of $555,000AUD per day for not complying with this directive.

The initial laws took effect in January  requiring the technology giants to provide specific details to the Australian government on their practices.

The new law gave the corporations 28 days to comply, but these requirements were largely ignored by Meta, Apple and Microsoft.

Now, the tech giants have withheld the information from the e-Safety Commissioner for nearly seven months.

Yet, it remains to be seen how the Australian government will follow through to force tech giants to provide their anti-child abuse processes from their platforms.

This matter raises a number of ongoing issues relating to control and compliance by mainstream digital and social media platforms.

The Australian government has introduced laws surrounding cyber bullying, violent material and the use of news on social media platforms, yet the laws have not been effective in creating significant change in the content and practices appearing online.

With billions of people using social media every day, the silence from tech giants such as Meta, Facebook and Microsoft may be because they do not have an effective process.

These organisations do not have human or technological resources to moderate the sheer volume of user content being posted.

At least 4.75 billion posts are uploaded by users every day, with many taking it upon themselves to report harmful content in their feeds.

The next few months will be crucial for the Australian Government’s e-Safety Commissioner in how this law will be enforced with the main aim of stamping out child abuse material online.

Report by Dr Karen Sutherland, University of the Sunshine Coast and Dharana Digital

Dr Karen Sutherland is a Senior Lecturer at the University of the Sunshine Coast where she designs and delivers social media education and research. Dr Sutherland is also the Co-Founder and Social Media Specialist at Dharana Digital marketing agency focused on helping people working in the health and wellness space.

Continue Reading

News

Atari acquisition ends the longest running console war

Published

on

Atari, the iconic gaming company, has revealed its acquisition of the Intellivision brand.

‘Uniting Atari and Intellivision after 45 years ends the longest running console war in history,” said Mike Mika, Studio Head at Digital Eclipse, an Atari-owned game studio.

This move is seen as a strategic step by Atari to expand its portfolio and tap into the nostalgia-driven market.

Emily Leaney from TeamRetro joins to discuss. #featured

Continue Reading

News

The United States is accelerating efforts into space warfare

Published

on

Is space warfare the next frontier of military competition?

On this episode of Hot Shots – the US expand efforts into space warfare, big tech commit to AI fail safes, while AI moves the markets and a buried treasure of ‘Holy Grail’ proportions is unearthed.

Ticker’s Ahron Young & Veronica Dudo discuss. #featured #trending

Continue Reading

News

Are silent vehicles putting pedestrians at risk?

Published

on

A recent study suggests that EVs and hybrids are more likely to be involved in pedestrian collisions compared to traditional internal combustion engine vehicles.

One possible explanation for this phenomenon is the quieter operation of electric vehicles at lower speeds, which can catch pedestrians off guard, particularly those who are visually impaired or distracted.

To counter this issue, all new EVs in Australia will be outfitted with AVAS – an audible alert to pedestrians to indicate a EV is headed in their direction.

Mike Costello from Cox Automotive joins to discuss. #featured

Continue Reading

Trending Now