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US food giant pays ransom to hackers

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JBS paid ransom to hackers.

Meatpacking giant JBS Foods paid an $11 million ransom to hackers following last month’s cyberattack.

JBS’ chief executive, Andre Nogueira said he made the payment to protect the company from any further attacks.

“This was a very difficult decision to make for our company and for me personally.”

The cyberattack forced JBS to close some plants and left experts concerned about the global food distribution network.

The FBI said Russian organisations, REvil and Sodinokibi were behind the attack. Officials said they “are working diligently to bring the threat actors to justice”.

White House spokeswoman Karine Jean-Pierre, said the US Government are working with their Russian counterparts.

“The White House is engaging directly with the Russian government on this matter and delivering the message that responsible states do not harbour ransomware criminals,” she said.

At the time of the ransom payment to the hackers, JBS’ facilities were operational. But Mr Nogueira said the company wants to mitigate other issues and ensure no data leaks.

“However, we felt this decision had to be made to prevent any potential risk for our customers.”

Investigations are still ongoing into the attack. However, the FBI described REvil and Sodinokibi as one of the most specialised and sophisticated cybercriminal groups in the world.

JBS Foods spends over $200 million on IT systems, including 850 IT professionals globally. It follows the operators of the Colonial Pipeline paying a $4.4 million ransom to hackers last month to regain control of their technical operations.

Costa is a news producer at ticker NEWS. He has previously worked as a regional journalist at the Southern Highlands Express newspaper. He also has several years' experience in the fire and emergency services sector, where he has worked with researchers, policymakers and local communities. He has also worked at the Seven Network during their Olympic Games coverage and in the ABC Melbourne newsroom. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts (Professional), with expertise in journalism, politics and international relations. His other interests include colonial legacies in the Pacific, counter-terrorism, aviation and travel.

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IRS to require facial recognition in order to file and pay taxes

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A major shake-up is coming to the way US citizens file their taxes

Citizens that file their taxes online tax will soon be required to submit a selfie to a third-party identity verification company using facial recognition tech in order to file their taxes or make IRS payments online.

According to Gizmodo, from this summer, online users with an IRS.gov account will no longer be able to log in with a simple username and password.

The new process will instead involve facial recognition. Users will need to provide a government identification document, a selfie, and copies of their bills to Virginian-based identity verification firm ID.me to confirm who they are.

That change, first noticed by Krebs on Security, marks a major shift for the IRS which previously allowed users to file their taxes without submitting personal biometric data.

Gizmodo reports that a statement from an IRS spokesperson said users can still receive basic information from the IRS website without logging in, however the representative added they would need to sign in through ID.me to make and view payments, access tax records, view or create payment plans, manage communications preference, or view tax authorisations.

Users attempting to log in to their accounts using ID.me will have to create an account with the company by uploading either a driver’s license, passport, or passport card.

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The international airlines suspending US flights

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Emirates has announced that it is suspending a majority of flights to the United States due to the planned launch of 5G

Flights are suspended to all destinations in the United States, except major cities including Los Angeles, New York and Washington.

Due to operational concerns associated with the planned deployment of 5G mobile network services in the US at certain airports

EMIRATES SAID in a memo to employees

Air India, All Nippon Airways, and Japan Airlines, have all suspended most routes to the United States as well.

This follows the world’s largest telecommunications company AT&T announcing it will delay the implementation of its 5G service at some airports in the United States.

This is all in response to CEOs of America’s largest airlines warning of a major disruption to travel and shipping if the service is rolled out. 

In an open letter, the executives call for 5G technology to be limited near US airports.

In the statement, the CEOs are requesting a limit on 5G within 2 miles of airport runways as defined by the FAA

It says “Immediate intervention is needed to avoid significant operational disruption to air passengers, shippers, supply chain and delivery of needed medical supplies”.

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Airline CEOs warn of major 5G disruption near airports

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CEO’s of America’s largest airlines are warning of a major disruption to travel and shipping

They’re calling for 5G technology to be limited near U.S airports

In an open letter also signed by shipping giants FedEec and UPS, the CEO’s wrote with urgency to request a limit on 5G within 2 miles of airport runways as defined by the FAA

The say that “Immediate intervention is needed to avoid significant operational disruption to air passengers, shippers, supply chain and delivery of needed medical supplies”

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