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112 new cases: Australia isolates entire state to prevent spread of Delta variant

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Australia cuts off one if its major states from the rest of the country as the Delta variant rapidly spreads

The Australian state of New South Wales has recorded 112 new cases of COVID-19.

While the majority of cases are close family contacts, 34 were in the community whilst infectious.

New South Wales is in the grips of its third week under lockdown conditions. However, the state has come under fire for not locking down sooner, and with harsher restrictions.

NSW Health has also advised that an infectious removalist visited the state of Victoria on July 8 and 9. Victoria is the country’s second largest state.

Victoria’s Health Minister, Martin Foley says the state government will list exposure sites soon. He added that people will need to isolate amid the emerging New South Wales’ Covid-19 outbreak.

As the world reopens for business, New South Wales shuts its doors

New South Wales’ lockdown will include major city Sydney, which is home to over 5 million people.

The rest of Australia remains open for business, including the country’s second-biggest state. The state of Victoria hasn’t recorded a new locally-acquired infection in over a week.

This all follows the news that a 90-year-old woman died from Covid yesterday. This is Australia’s first Covid-related death of the year.

New South Wales expected to reach over 100 positive cases

The state’s premier, Gladys Berejiklian says she expects the upward trend of new cases will continue this week. Experts anticipate there will be around 100 new positive results in the state recorded today.

It follows New South Wales recording 77 new locally acquired Covid-19 cases, with 42 active in the community whilst infectious.

The Premier says she’s anticipating the numbers in New South Wales “will be greater than 100 tomorrow”. She also said she’ll be “shocked” if they’re not.

Global Politics

Biden battles on – Trump Turmoil deepens

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As Washington prepares to take its summer break, President Biden continues to battle on the policy and program fronts he has led since Inauguration Day

On his agenda?

  • Ending the pandemic
  • Restoring the economy
  • Pursuing voting rights
  • Social equity
  • Racial justice
  • Gun control
  • Confronting climate change
  • And restoring America’s leadership in the world

In each area, there is progress – and challenges

With 70% of Americans now vaccinated, the Delta strain is hurting, with infections accelerating to significant levels – but the vaccines work. 

This is a pandemic of the unvaccinated

of the 164 million Americans who are inoculated, 99.9% have not tested positive for Covid

Fewer people still are hospitalized or dead.

The renewed push to get as many as possible protected is now being augmented by mandates from governments and businesses that their employees are to get the jabs as a condition of employment.  (This may prove ultimately to be the key for the last mile of protection here in Australia.)

What about the economy?

Employment is up, the economy is growing at over 6%, and wages are increasing, with $15 per hour the new norm in many businesses.

Child poverty is being cut in half, but employment is still not back at pre-Covid levels. Millions who are behind in their rent face possible eviction in the coming weeks.

While Biden has campaigned strongly on protecting voting rights, ending police violence, gun control, greater access to education and tackling global warming, no legislation on those fronts has yet been enacted. 

On a foreign front – under Biden’s leadership, America is absolutely back with US alliances strong across Europe and Asia

U.S President Joe Biden, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, talk during their meeting at the ‘Villa la Grange’ in Geneva, Switzerland in Geneva, Switzerland, Wednesday, June 16, 2021. (Mikhail Metzel/Pool Photo via AP)

However, there is turmoil in Afghanistan, prospects have dimmed for a renewed nuclear agreement with Iran, relations with Russia are testy, tensions with China are as intense as ever, and there is no dialogue with North Korea.

In Washington, the toughest tests of Biden’s legislative program are pending right now 

He is applying all the lessons learned from his and President Obama’s first term in working his Democrats and those Republicans who are willing to win his policies on infrastructure, education, climate, and health care. 

Biden knows that his presidency is in the balance.

As Biden battles on, the man he defeated, Donald Trump, continues to spread turmoil and division.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump waves as he arrives at Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., January 20, 2021. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo

Trump will not countenance any blame or responsibility for the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6 – an attack intended to stop the certification of Biden’s electoral victory. 

Trump’s hold over the Republican Party, and especially the Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, upended the formation of a bipartisan independent commission to examine the threat to democracy posed by Trump.  

Trump is determined to remain a potent force in the party, and the decider of its future. 

He has raised more money this year than anyone else – over $100 million – and supplicants journey to his homes to pay tribute and seek favour.  

Trump is hardly invincible. There are chinks in his cladding.  His preferred candidate for a House seat in Texas lost to another Republican Trump declined to endorse. 

Damning notes from the Justice Department show Trump’s intense pressure on the Acting Attorney General to declare the election corrupt; he refused.

The Biden Justice Department has ruled that Trump’s tax returns have to be turned over to Congress.  Trump attacked the Republicans supporting the bipartisan infrastructure deal with Biden – but the agreement is holding.

In this Washington summer, Biden is steady at the helm, but the waters are choppy.  And Trump keeps making waves whenever he plunges into the pool.

Author

  • Bruce Wolpe is a Ticker News US political contributor. He’s a Senior Fellow at the US Studies Centre and has worked with Democrats in Congress during President Barack Obama's first term, and on the staff of Prime Minister Julia Gillard. He has also served as the former PM's chief of staff.

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Global Politics

Love Actually in real life – Brits unite with U.S vaxxed travellers

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At 4 am local time, Britain officially opened its borders to fully vaccinated travellers from both the US and EU, allowing friends and family to reunite after months apart

LONDON’S HEATHROW AIRPORT

The border restrictions apply to all of the countries on the UK’s so-called “amber list” – except for France which is suffering from a recent uptick in Covid-19 infections.

Travellers wanting to arrive in Britain will be required to take a test prior to departure as well as another swab on the second day after touching down.

Since July 19, all people in who were vaccinated in the U-K have been able to travel freely to and from amber nations – but these new laws open the borders up to travellers who were vaccinated in other countries.

It follows major airline companies welcoming the changes to border restrictions, saying it will provide a much needed boost to the aviation and travel sector.

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Global Politics

Less than 1% of fully vaxxed Americans ending up in hospital

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A new US based study on Covid-19 has found that less than one percent of fully vaccinated Americans experience a breakthrough infection

UKRAINE – 2020/04/29: In this photo illustration the Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases world map by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) seen displayed in internet on a pc screen. The number of the COVID-19 coronavirus confirmed cases in the United States exceeded one million and exceeded three million in the world, according of COVID-19 Dashboard by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University (JHU). The World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a global pandemic on 11 March 2020. (Photo Illustration by Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

The federal government data from the Centre for Disease Control says vaccinated people have a 0.004 percent chance of ending up in hospital with Covid-19 and it’s an even lower figure when it comes to developing severe illness which results in death.

Out of 163 million vaccinated citizens, only around 6,000 have experienced a severe breakthrough Covid-19 infection

The statistics are a promising sign on the road to normalcy as many nations continue to open up and move into a post-pandemic world.

The analysis also found that more than 90 percent of current Covid-related hospitalisations and deaths are being recorded in unvaccinated people.

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