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World’s biggest meat supplier allegedly receives ransom demand from Russia

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JBS Foods paid ransom to hackers.

The world’s largest meat processor JBS says they were asked to pay ransom in an alleged Russian cyber attack.

The hack forced JBS to close some plants. Experts worry this may put global food distribution at risk and wiping out nearly a fifth of America’s meat production.

JBS says it received the demand from “a criminal organisation likely based in Russia”.

The company added that the attack also affected its operations in Australia and North America. However, JBS said the attack didn’t impact its backup servers.

The attack on JBS forced the shutdown of some of the world’s largest slaughterhouses. And there are signs that closures are spreading.

The White House statement on JBS comes as yet another major US sector finds its operations under duress. This comes less than a month after a major cyber attack temporarily shut down the Colonial Pipeline network.

The FBI is now investigating the incident.

Majority of Plants Will Be Operational Wednesday

JBS says it’s made “significant progress” to resolve the cyber attack.

The owner of JBS USA and Pilgrim’s Pride Corp. said some of the company’s pork, poultry and prepared foods plants were operational. Furthermore, the company’s beef facility in Canada has resumed production.

“Our systems are coming back online and we are not sparing any resources to fight this threat.”

JBS USA Chief Executive Officer Andre Nogueira in A statement TO BLOOMBERG

“We have cyber-security plans in place to address these types of issues and we are successfully executing those plans.”

How does this impact the global food supply chain?

The cyber attack on JBS comes as the latest threat to global food supply chains.

The attack focused on the Brazilian company’s computer networks, impacting the five biggest beef plants in the US, all up handling 22 thousand 500 cattle a day.

It shut JBS’ Australian and North American computer networks and sidelined two shifts. This further halted processing at one of Canada’s largest meatpacking plants, but that beef facility has since resumed production.

Australian Operations were also down, whereas operations in Mexico and the U.K. were not affected.

Australia’s federal government took action to minimise impact on supply chain, Federal Agriculture Minister David said the technology and “systems they [JBS] use, go to the heart of the quality assurance of the beef that they process.”

“So we need to make sure that we can get that up and going to give confidence, not just to consumers here in Australia, but also to our export markets,” he said on Tuesday.

Despite the impact, the company was able to ship product from nearly all of its facilities to its customers

Concerns after cyber attack on U.S pipeline impacted gas supply

JBS has 47 facilities across Australia and operates the largest network of production facilities and feedlots in the country.

Hackers have the commodities complex in their crosshairs, with the JBS attack coming just three weeks after Darkside targeted the biggest US gasoline pipeline.

The Colonial Pipeline experienced a cyberattack that shut down its nationwide network on 7 May. As such, millions of barrels of petrol, diesel and jet fuel stopped flowing.

The hackers are from Russia’s “DarkSide”, who allegedly steal from larger corporations and give the ransom funds to charity.

After the cyberattack, President Joe Biden signed an executive order to strengthen cybersecurity defences across the US.

Business

Germany recalls Tesla models due to emergency fault

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Tesla is in the spotlight again, with Germany’s road traffic agency recalling models Y and 3 due to a fault in the automatic emergency call system

It’s a fault that could possibly impact around 59,000 vehicles globally.

Germany’s watchdog says a software flaw is causing a breakdown of the e-Call, a system designed to alert authorities after a serious accident.

The glitch follows the company delivered almost 18 per cent fewer electric vehicles in the second quarter than in the previous.

This is largely due to China’s Covid-19-related shutdowns and the ongoing supply chain crunch.

Meanwhile, CEO Elon Musk says Tesla’s new factories in both Texas and Berlin are “losing billions of dollars”.

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World’s first city to charge tourists for visiting

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If you’re lucky to be heading abroad this summer, a visit to the famous canals in Venice, Italy might be on your itinerary, but beware of new fees to come.

Venice will charge most of its visitors an entry fee from next year as it tries to tackle overcrowding.

The city’s tourism chief says Venice are pioneers and will be the first city in the world to apply a measure that could be revolutionary.

From mid January next year, day-trippers must book their visit online before travelling.

They will pay a basic fee of 3 euro, which will rise to 10 euro at peak times.

Tourism is bouncing back in Venice after the pandemic with daily visitors again often outnumbering the 50-thousand residents of the city centre.

The scheme will be closely watched by other popular tourist destinations, overwhelmed with travellers around the world.

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Pubs in UK declining by thousands, new research

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It’s no secret Brit’s love their Pub Grub, but plating up Bangers and Mash is a tradition on the decline

The number of pubs in England and Wales is continuing to fall, hitting its lowest level on record this year

After struggling through Covid the industry now faced soaring prices and higher energy costs, it warned.

There were just under 40-thousand pubs in June, down by 7,000 in the past decade, according to new research.

In fact, thousands of pubs have closed as younger people drink less, supermarkets sell cheaper alcohol and the industry complains of being too heavily taxed.

Pubs which had “disappeared” from the communities they once served had either been demolished or converted for other purposes, meaning that they were “lost forever”.

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