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How to cut aviation emissions by 20% overnight

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After years of dithering, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), has finally come to an agreement on a plan to reduce aviation’s carbon emissions.

At a meeting in Montreal, the ICAO pledged to support an “aspirational” net zero aviation goal by 2050. The plan, seen as a compromise by many, was accepted by the 193 countries who are members of ICAO. However green groups say the deal is weak and not legally binding. Let’s take a closer look.

The Problem with Flying

There’s no denying that flying is a huge contributor to global carbon emissions. In 2018, aviation accounted for about 2% of global CO2 emissions, according to the BBC. And those emissions are only projected to grow in the coming years as the demand for air travel continues to increase. That’s why it’s so important that we have a plan in place to reduce those emissions. Otherwise, we’re facing some pretty dire consequences down the road.

The ICAO Deal

So what exactly does this deal entailed? Well, under the terms of the agreement, ICAO member countries have committed to stabilizing carbon dioxide emissions from aviation at 2020 levels by 2025. After that, they’ve pledged to cut those emissions by half by 2050, compared to 2005 levels.

However, it’s important to note that these targets are entirely voluntary and there are no consequences for countries that don’t meet them. That’s why many environmentalists are criticizing the deal as being too weak and ineffective. Nevertheless, it’s a start and it’s better than nothing.

But aviation analyst Geoffrey Thomas from Airline Ratings says governments around the world could easily cut emissions by making changes to air traffic control.

Ahron Young is an award winning journalist who has covered major news events around the world. Ahron is the Managing Editor and Founder of TICKER NEWS.

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TikTok could be banned in the United States

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TikTok in the firing line after Chinese balloon was shot down

 
China has hit back at the U.S. after officials shot down a suspected Chinese spy balloon off the coast of South Carolina.

Washington says it was being used to monitor strategic sites.

But Beijing rejects this – claiming the balloon was a civilian airship used to monitor the weather.

The incident is just the latest in a long line of diplomatic disputes between the two countries.

Now, TikTok could be banned in the U.S. in the wake of the incident.

Republicans are now pushing for Washington to distance itself from the Beijing-based app. #trending #featured

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Companies to pay extra for verified Twitter accounts

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Elon Musk has announced that companies and brands will have to pay $1,000 per month – plus an additional $50 per sub-account – to get verified check-marks on Twitter

The new pricing falls under the new Twitter Blue for Business service.

Within the next few months, only paying Twitter customers will have verified status.

Twitter has stacked on $12.5 billion in debt, and this move hopes to increase subscription revenue to meet Musk’s obligations.

Advertisers halted spending on Twitter after the takeover, but Twitter has since announced partnerships with two brand-safety vendors to win back marketers.

Musk also announced that Twitter would start sharing ad revenue with creators for “ads that appear in their reply threads”, but didn’t provide further detail.

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BMW to invest €800 million in Mexico

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BMW is set to invest €800 million in Mexico, to produce its next generation of high-voltage and fully electric batteries

 
The carmaker is looking to convert more than half of its sales into all-electric cars by 2030.

Construction will begin next year with production beginning in 2027.

The announcement follows several other major expansions from the automaker in recent months, including a $1.7 billion investment in the United States.

The move will add around 1,000 new jobs to its Mexico operations.

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