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Do western economies hold the COVAX sharing scheme’s key to success?

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Western economies can feel the end of the pandemic is in sight… but things look grim for many other parts of the world.

UNICEF and World Health Organisation chiefs are calling on G7 countries to donate more COVID-19 vaccines to the global COVAX supply

The show is back on for London theatres… reopened to live audiences.

People can sit indoors in pubs and even hug each other again.

It’s the biggest lift of coronavirus restrictions since the start of the UK’s successful vaccination campaign.

Although things seem well for most developed countries like in the UK, the grass isn’t greener on the other side.

The World Health Organisation director-general says the world has reached a situation of “vaccine apartheid”,

The chief is urging Vaccine makers to speed up COVAX jabs…sooner than planned.

This follows a severe shortfall, following a curb on exports from India.

So far…The US makes up 20 per cent of the nearly 1.4 billion jabs given worldwide.

Where as Africa’s three most populous countries – Nigeria, Ethiopia and Egypt, home to more than 400 million people – each account for just 0.1 per cent.

Developing countries are seeking ways to bridge that gap.

President Joe Biden said the US will send at least 20 million more COVID-19 vaccine doses overseas by the end of June.

Western countries have been slow to share their doses, even among themselves. 

But are world leaders now using their country’s vaccine supply as a diplomatic tool now the pandemic situation at home… is on the way up.

Global Politics

This country is giving free chickens to vaccinated residents

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Free chickens are being given to vaccinated residents in one Indonesian village.

Older people in Indonesia are receiving free chickens if they are vaccinated against COVID-19.

The program is part of the Cianjur Regency’s push to increase the number of vaccines administered to citizens aged 45 and over.

Galih Apria is the assistant police commissioner in the sub-district of Pecat. He says older residents were hesitant about getting their shots.

“Early on, there was a lot of misinformation and hoaxes about the vaccine circulating online, especially on social media,” Mr Apria said.

“Lots of elderly people thought that it does not prevent COVID-19 but would cause serious diseases and even death.”

25 in 250 local residents were vaccinated before the program. But since the free chicken campaign started, 250 people are lining up per day.

Mr Apria explains that free chickens are a sign of respect towards the elderly population. The chickens are reportedly easing people’s apprehensions with the health officials and vaccine.

Around 12 million Indonesians are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, or 4.3 percent of the entire population. However, over 53,000 Indonesians have lost their lives to COVID-19.

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Global Politics

“I did what I came to do”: Everything you need to know from Biden-Putin summit

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It’s the talk the world was waiting for. U.S President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin have completed the “first meeting of its kind” since 2018. Here’s the top 5 outcomes you need to know:

1. The US is not against Russia… but for the American people

The summit is being viewed as a milestone event for the two nations, with relations between Russia and the US at an all-time low.

Biden says his agenda is “not against Russia”, but the President is working to defend the American public and America’s democracy.

Biden says “it’s always better to meet face-to-face” and both leaders praised the talks, but it is seen as just a small step towards mending the fractured diplomatic relationship.

Bruce Wolpe, Ticker’s US political contributor and a visiting fellow at the U-S Studies Centre says the world seems “a little bit safer now”.

“If both men understand each other, the chance of making mistakes and things getting out of hand, because they don’t know what the other side is doing… has diminished,” Wolpe told Ticker NEWS.

Bruce Wolpe, Ticker’s US political contributor

2. The road to mending fractured diplomatic relations

The leaders began with discussions about nuclear arms control and agreed that they would both return ambassadors to each other’s capitals.

The Russian and American envoys were withdrawn in March following allegations that Russia meddled in the US election.

When the meeting wrapped up, both leaders praised the talks, but it is seen as just a small step towards mending the fractured diplomatic relationship.

Putin says Biden is “an experienced statesman” and believes the two leaders “spoke the same language”.

Biden says Russia does not want “another cold war”, and there is now a genuine prospect to improve relations.

“if progress can be made because russia is cooperating, that will set a good tone for the next couple of years”

3. Cyber attacks: What President Biden told Putin was ‘off-limits’

Putin says most hackers are based out of the United States, with Biden responding by saying that his country’s critical infrastructure, like water and energy, is “off-limits”.

Putin says his talks with President Biden were “quite constructive,” and that they reached an agreement on cyber security.

Lester Munson, a Senior Fellow at the National Security Institute told TickerNEWS LIVE that following recent ransomeware attacks, cyber security is one of America’s biggest threats.

Lester Munson, a Senior Fellow at the National Security institute.

However, it’s important to mention that cyber security isn’t the most critical threat and the senior fellow says Putin has another agenda.

munson on putin’s agenda as a world leader.

In the past week, Putin has described Donald Trump as an extraordinary and talented individual.

Munson says Biden has done a ‘better job’ than Trump to “be on the global stage of diplomacy”.

Munson says biden has “a leg up” on the global stage

4. The west doesn’t listen to Russia enough

Putin wanted to make it clear that Russia remains a world leader and is an important country with an economy that still matters to the United States and to the world, and that’s why President Biden arranged the meeting.

Emeritus Professor from La trobe university Joseph Camilleri who says the West doesn’t listen to Russia enough.

Camilleri says the West hears very little about putin’s agenda.

5. What does this mean for the rest of the world?

Firstly, Biden believes Russia is “being squeezed by china” and it is in Putin’s best interest to engage in a productive relationship with America.

When discussing the fate of Alexi Navalny, Putin says the Russian opposition leader “ignored the law” and denied accusations that he was poisoned by Russian officials.

Biden was also asked why he thought Russia would have any desire to cooperate with the US.

On this, Biden says Russia is in a “very difficult spot right now”, and the country is trying to stay relevant and remain a major power.

The US president was also pressed by reporters who asked why he is so confident that Putin’s behaviour will change.

Wolpe says the message Biden is sending is showcasing “what the United States is all about”

“Both countries need to regard themselves as being on an equal footing,”

PROFESSOR Camilleri.

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Global Politics

China launches crewed spacecraft Shenzhou-12 in historic mission

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China has marked a major moment in space history

Launching a spacecraft carrying three astronauts, the mission is now on to complete the country’s space station by the end of next year.

It will be the longest stay in low Earth orbit by any Chinese national.

As part of its plans to have a fully crewed space station by December 2022, China successfully launched the first core module earlier this year.

There is no official announcement yet on when the other sections of the space station will launch, but the module is expected to operate for at least 10 years.

Chinese astronauts have long been excluded from the international space station, due to US political objections and legal restrictions.

The three-month stay for the three men will be the longest for any Chinese astronauts, and one focus will be seeing how they handle their relatively long time in orbit.

During their sojourn on the cylinder-like Tianhe, slightly bigger than a bus, the three men will test the module’s technologies, including its life-support system.

The Tianhe, which means “Harmony of the Heavens”, is a cylinder 16.6 metres long and 4.2 metres in diameter.

The men will also be monitored for how they fare in space physically and psychologically for an extended period of time.

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