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Australian ski resorts suffer warm winter, Europe next

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As winter in Australia saw grassy slopes instead of snowy mountains, it became evident that climate change is already impacting ski resorts globally.

A study, which models the effects of a warming planet on European ski resorts, provides a stark warning about the consequences of climate change.

Europe boasts about half of the world’s ski resorts, all heavily reliant on consistent and predictable snowfall. Published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the research indicates that 53 percent of European ski resorts face a “very high risk” of insufficient snow supply with less than 2 degrees Celsius of global warming above pre-industrial levels.

This risk jumps to a staggering 98 percent with less than 4 degrees Celsius of warming. Current global temperatures are already at 1.2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

Very high risk

Dr. Samuel Morin, the lead author from France’s National Centre for Meteorological Research, explained that this “very high risk” assessment is based on the frequency of challenging conditions, such as snow-poor winters, rather than average snow conditions. He likened it to a heatwave, where what matters is the frequency of extreme events.

The decline in snowfall is primarily due to warming temperatures causing precipitation to fall as rain rather than snow. Artificial snowmaking is an option to mitigate this, but it comes at a cost. The study found that artificial snowmaking could reduce the number of resorts at “very high risk” to 27 percent under 2 degrees Celsius of warming and 71 percent under 4 degrees Celsius. However, this approach results in a 20 to 40 percent increase in water demand, which in turn drives up energy consumption and carbon emissions.

The ski industry and governments now face the challenge of adapting to climate change while reducing emissions, as ski tourism contributes to climate change through factors like transportation and housing.

In Australia, the impact of climate change on ski resorts has been evident since the 1950s, leading to a decline in snow depth and duration of the snow season. The number of snowfall days has also decreased, resulting in more unpredictable conditions.

Experts point out that while there will still be good snow days, the changing climate leads to a greater variability between boom years with heavy snowfall and bust years with less snow, making it challenging for ski resorts to predict and manage snow conditions.

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Trump officially nominates J.D. Vance to be his Presidential running mate

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Former President Donald Trump has officially nominated J.D. Vance as his running mate for the upcoming presidential election, cementing Vance’s role in the Republican ticket.

J.D. Vance, once a vocal critic of his policies, has been selected by the former President to be his running mate in the upcoming presidential election.

Ticker’s Ahron Young discusses all the latest. #featured #trending

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Esports officially recognised by Olympic officials as they aim to “keep up with digital age”

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Saudi Arabia will host the first official Olympic Esports Games in 2025, in a bid to “keep up with digital age”.

The decision comes amidst growing global interest in esports and the influence and cultural impact of gaming in the digital era.

The event aims to showcase top esports talent and foster international unity through competitive gaming on a global stage.

Emily Leaney discusses all the latest.

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Political left gains ground in France and UK amid rising geopolitical tensions

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France and the UK have seen unexpected political shifts to the left, challenging predictions of a populist right surge.

2024 is the year of the election, and amid uncertainty of the election results, global tensions are rising between each nation.

In the backdrop of economic uncertainties and geopolitical rivalries, each nation’s electoral outcomes could significantly influence global stability and cooperation efforts.

Professor Tim Harcourt from UTS and The Airport Economist joins to discuss. #featured #trending #global view

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