Connect with us

Tech

Australian government imposes ‘anti-troll’ legislation to unmask bullies

Published

on

Social media networks could be held responsible for defamatory comments posted on their platforms

Social media will no longer be a safe space for internet trolls in Australia as the government introduces a new legislation.

The “anti-troll” law will hold social media networks including Facebook and Instagram responsible for any offensive and harmful comments published on their platforms.

The new legislation marks these networks as the publisher of comments which will put them at risk of defamation claims in Australian courts.

If such a case does reach court the platforms will be required to provide details of the person behind the trolling account.

Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison says this change will permit more free speech and accountability within the nation.

He says that “in a free society such as Australia where we value our free speech it is only free when that is balanced with the responsibility for what you say”.

He added that “Free speech is not being allowed to cowardly hide in your basement and sledge and slur and harass people anonymously and seek to destroy their lives”.

Natasha is an Associate Producer at ticker NEWS with a Bachelor of arts from Monash University. She has previously worked at Sky News Australia and Monash University as an Online Content Producer.

Business

Four-day office week for Snapchat employees

Published

on

Snapchat is asking workers to return to the office 80% of the time, or the equivalent of four days a week.

They want workers back from the start of next year.

It’s the latest sign of tech employees receiving less flexibility nearly three years after the pandemic took hold.

It also comes amid a wave of cost-cutting in the tech sector.

The company says in a statement: “We believe that being together in person, while retaining flexibility for our team members, will enhance our ability to deliver on our strategic priorities of growing our community, driving revenue growth, and leading in [augmented reality].”

The new policy will take effect at the end of February.

Continue Reading

Business

Twitter quietly cancels COVID misinformation policy

Published

on

More big changes at Twitter under the new Elon Musk ownership.

This time, its Twitter’s controversial COVID misinformation policy, which the social platform has quietly canceled.

Twitter said in December 2020 that it would begin to label and remove misinformation about Covid-19 vaccines.

But Twitter CEO Elon Musk has been a vocal critic of how health officials reacted to the coronavirus pandemic.

Musk has committed to free speech on Twitter, which might explain why the change has now been enacted.

But online safety experts have contended his approach has led to an increase in hate speech, harassment and misinformation on the platform.

Continue Reading

Tech

Hospital staff have resorted to using pen and paper following cyber breach

Published

on

Vanuatu’s public service remains offline nearly a month after a ransomware attack on the nation’s government.

The ABC reports hospital staff have resorted to using pen and paper, as key infrastructure remains offline.

Senior ministers describing the incident as a “serious breach” of national security.

Cybersecurity staff were told about the attack when government websites became unavailable.

Port Vila’s hospital has also been badly affected, with staff using pen and paper for some medical records.

It’s understood some government employees are using their personal email addresses and hotspots to complete their work.

Continue Reading

Trending Now

Copyright © 2022 The Ticker Company PTY LTD