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This Aussie vegetable is harvesting into a $100M industry

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When you think about the Aussie export market, you might think about coal, meat or even gold… but this golden vegetable is making its way to the top of the country’s export list.

Australian carrot exports rose more than 7 per cent last year to become a $100 million dollar industry.

While exports of fresh vegetables were down overall last year, carrot exports increased in both volume and value.

Over 110,000 tonnes of carrots were exported last year with the majority sent to Asia and the Middle East.

Western Australian carrot production continues to expand to meet increasing international demand, and the state accounted for 85 per cent of carrot exports.

Incoming AUSVEG chief executive Michael Coote says that with hospitality and the food service sector shutting down in Australia as a result of the pandemic, the exact same situation was happening in export markets.

“Restaurants, cafes, hotels, bars and pubs were all shut down and people were eating from home.  So retail demand went up considerably in a lot of countries, as it did here … and carrots, as a staple vegetable that we use in the majority of the dinners, did too. The same thing was happening in Singapore, Hong Kong and all of our major markets.”

“Carrot exports have continued to grow, especially in the past couple of years,” Mr Coote told abc.net.au.

What other goods lead Australia’s export market?

The nation still leads the world when it comes to exporting ironcoal and petroleum gases.

Australia’s biggest export products by value in 2020 were iron, coal, petroleum gases, gold and aluminium. In aggregate, those major exports account for 63.1% of overall exports sales from Australia.

The following export product groups categorize the highest dollar value in Australian global shipments during 2020. Also shown is the percentage share each export category represents in terms of overall exports from Australia.

  1. Ores, slag, ash: US$91.3 billion (35.9% of total exports)
  2. Mineral fuels including oil: $65.4 billion (25.7%)
  3. Gems, precious metals: $19.6 billion (7.7%)
  4. Meat: $10.4 billion (4.1%)
  5. Inorganic chemicals: $5.2 billion (2%)
  6. Machinery including computers: $4.4 billion (1.7%)
  7. Cereals: $3.8 billion (1.5%)
  8. Pharmaceuticals: $3.4 billion (1.4%)
  9. Electrical machinery, equipment: $3.1 billion (1.2%)
  10. Aluminum: $3.1 billion (1.2%)

Business

Big tech stocks tumble amid market uncertainty

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Big tech companies are struggling in the markets this quarter as interest rates rise to battle inflation

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has devalued tech stocks causing further supply chain disruptions and sending the broad S&P 500 index down about 5 per cent.

Rising interest rates triggered more severe plummets with the S&P dropping another 16 per cent and the Nasdaq Composite index by 22 per cent.

Tesla’s stock took a huge hit sinking to nearly 38 per cent its largest decline since 2010.

Amazon saw similar results falling by 35 per cent the most in over 20 years.

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Business

Google to pay millions to app developers

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App developers are accusing Google of tempting users into making in-app purchases.

The lawsuit relates to money that was made by app creators for Android smartphones.

The lawsuit was filed in a San Francisco court, where the 48,000 app developers are believed to have been affected.

“Following our win against Apple for similar conduct, we think this pair of settlements sends a strong message to big tech: the law is watching, and even the most powerful companies in the world are accountable when they stifle competition.”

Steve Berman, ATTORNEY FOR the Android developers.

Google says the settlement’s funds will support developers who have made less than USD $2 million in revenue between 2016 and 2021.

“A vast majority of U.S. developers who earned revenue through Google Play will be eligible to receive money from this fund, if they choose,” the company says.

Google says it will charge developers a 15 per cent commission on their first million in revenue.

The court is yet to approve the proposed settlement.

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Tesla deliveries expected to fall – here’s why

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Tesla deliveries are expected to drop significantly in the second quarter, as prolonged Covid lockdowns in China and supply chain issues take their toll

The company is also struggling to ramp up its new factories, with Tesla boss Elon Musk seemingly distracted by his very public pursuit of Twitter.

Tesla has been plagued by production glitches in China and slow output growth at new factories in both Texas and Berlin.

Experts predict deliveries will slump to just over 295,000 vehicles for the second quarter.

This would be down from the company’s record of 310,000 in the preceding quarter, marking Tesla’s first quarter-on-quarter decline since 2020.

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