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Young people join protest in France against pension reforms

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Young people are taking to the streets in France as Macron pushes ahead with raising nation’s retirement age

Huge crowds have gathered in France in recent weeks to protest a controversial rise in the country’s pension age by two years to 64.

Some of the marches have turned violent.

While the reform is most relevant to those approaching retirement, many young people are also taking to the streets.

But why might that be?

The French youth have joined the protests in growing numbers since the government bypassed parliament to push the plans through.

Every night for the past few weeks, 18-year-old Charles Chauliac has been making his voice heard. Not just for his parents, but for himself.

“I am against this reform simply because I have two parents who are killing themselves at work and damaging their health and I don’t want to see them die at work. My father, he works every day, he gets up to get on the tarmac at Charles de Gaulle airport at 5 a.m. to load the planes. I find it difficult to imagine myself at 64 getting up at 3 a.m.”

Chauliac is part of groups started by university students to organize unauthorized demonstrations, which are usually carried out in the evenings.

While a few protesters have been seen torching bins and throwing rocks at police, Chauliac insists he hasn’t.

Opinion polls show a wide majority of voters are opposed to the pension bill.

They are further angered by Macron’s leadership style and the government’s decision to skip the parliamentary vote.

“For young people like me, we grew up with the hope of being able to influence our society. And when we see that decisions are made without consulting the people who make up this society, that takes away the possibility of being able to change things.”

Many students, like Chauliac, have been joining private groups on social media which help students mobilize for spontaneous protests.

He says they help prevent the groups being noticed by police.

But does Chauliac worry about the repercussions, should the demonstrations get out of hand?

“I wonder about that, because I know what can happen to us too, we see the images and we see what happens to fellow protesters, but that wouldn’t prevent me from demonstrating, because I’m so outraged that it surpasses potentially endangering myself.”

Macron recently said he would press ahead with the reforms.

Unions have called for regional action, and the continuation of nationwide strikes and protests.

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Google’s AI-powered search engine goes wild

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Google’s AI-powered search engine has been suggesting unconventional combinations, leaving users bewildered and even concerned at the results.

Users have taken to social media platforms to express their astonishment and amusement at the unusual search results.

Dr Karen Sutherland from UniSC joins to discuss. #featured #trending

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Leaders

Tim Cook eyes a worthy successor to the Apple empire

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As Apple CEO Tim Cook’s tenure at the company enters its later years, speculation swirls regarding who will succeed the tech giant’s iconic leader.

On this episode of Ahron & Mike Live – Canva makes a break for Broadway, AI has been likened to a ‘demigod’, astronomers develop new tech to counter asteroids and has Apple found its next successor? #featured

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Netflix CEO is confident AI will not replace writers

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Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos reassured writers that artificial intelligence won’t replace them or jeopardize their jobs.

While acknowledging AI’s role in content recommendation and production efficiency, Sarandos emphasised the importance of human creativity in crafting compelling narratives.

Tom Finnigan from Talkingbrands.ai joins to discuss.

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