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Tech

Why the fear of missing out is driving AI investments

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Tech behemoths are not only flexing their financial muscles but also exhibiting a palpable fear of missing out as they race to seize stakes in the generative AI landscape.

In a regulatory environment that has dampened traditional acquisition strategies, companies like Amazon, Microsoft, and Alphabet are funneling billions into startups at a dizzying pace.

The latest headline-grabbing move came from Amazon, which announced a staggering $2.75 billion investment in Anthropic, an AI startup specialising in generative models.

This investment marks Amazon’s largest venture deal to date and underscores the escalating fervor in the AI gold rush.

At the heart of this frenzy lies a competitive scramble among tech giants to integrate generative AI into their product ecosystems.

With the market projected to exceed $1 billion in revenue within a decade, companies like Meta, Apple, and Google are sparing no expense to ensure they remain at the vanguard of innovation.

Generative AI deals

In 2023 alone, investors injected a staggering $29.1 billion into nearly 700 generative AI deals, representing a remarkable 260% increase in value from the previous year, according to PitchBook data.

Notably, a substantial portion of these funds emanated from tech titans themselves, highlighting their fervent quest to stay ahead in the AI arms race.

Fred Havemeyer, head of U.S. AI and software research at Macquarie, underscores the role of FOMO in driving these investment decisions. “They definitely don’t want to miss out on being part of the AI ecosystem,” says Havemeyer. “I definitely think that there’s FOMO in this marketplace.”

Specialised chips

Fueling this investment spree is the exorbitant cost of developing and training AI models, a process that demands thousands of specialised chips, predominantly sourced from Nvidia. Meta, for instance, has disclosed pouring billions into Nvidia’s graphics processing units to bolster its proprietary AI model, Llama.

The investment landscape also reveals a symbiotic relationship between tech giants and AI startups. Companies like Nvidia, Microsoft, Google, and Amazon are not only investing financially but also extending infrastructural support, offering cloud credits, and facilitating partnerships to bolster the AI ecosystem.

In the case of Amazon’s alliance with Anthropic, the collaboration extends beyond mere investment. Anthropic will leverage Amazon Web Services for its computing needs and utilise Amazon’s chips, while Amazon gains access to Anthropic’s cutting-edge AI models, which will be distributed to AWS customers.

Ahron Young is an award winning journalist who has covered major news events around the world. Ahron is the Managing Editor and Founder of TICKER NEWS.

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News

Major Microsoft outage shuts down airlines, news and cloud servers worldwide

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A widespread Microsoft outage is affecting Australia’s supermarkets, banks and telecommunications companies.

A widespread Microsoft outage is affecting Australia’s supermarkets, banks, telecommunications companies.

There are also reports of outages in Japan and the United States.

The ongoing widespread outage is reportedly related to US-based cybersecurity provider CrowdStrike. Its ‘Falcon sensor’ is installed on many business computers to gather security data.

In a statement to Ticker News, StickmanCyber said:

“Multiple StickmanCyber security engineering and our 24×7/365 security operations teams across the country support reports that this outage is related to a CrowdStrike update. 
 
“It is our understanding that any business running versions 7.15 and 7.16 are affected by the outage, but 7.17 seems to be ok. We are waiting on official advisory from CrowdStrike on these findings but doing our best to help affected customers. It’s a lesson to always update your software, but obviously this is an extreme example. IT security tools are all designed to ensure that companies can continue to operate in the worst-case scenario of a data breach, so to be the root cause of a global IT outage is an unmitigated disaster.
 
“Crowdstrike support is offering a workaround to customers. It claims users may be able to fix the issue by booting windows in safe mode or in the Windows Recovery Environment and deleting a file named “C-00000291*.sys”.   

“CrowdStrike is aware of reports of crashes on Windows hosts related to the Falcon sensor,” the company said in a statement on its website.

“Symptoms include hosts experiencing a bugcheck\blue screen error related to the Falcon sensor. Our engineering teams are actively working to resolve this issue and there is no need to open a support ticket.

“Status updates will be posted below [on the Microsoft websit€0 as we have more information to share, including when the issue is resolved.”

Laptops down

Thousands of users across the world reported problems with Microsoft services to Downdector.com, a website that tracks service disruptions.

Microsoft laptops suddenly restarted across Australia on Friday afternoon.

Outage website Downdetector shows issues across companies including NAB, Bendigo Bank, Telstra, CBA, Google.

Microsoft response

As users take to social media to complain, Microsoft reported a service outage for its Microsoft 365 apps and services, affecting businesses and users across the world.

“We’re investigating an issue impacting users ability to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services,” Microsoft 365 Status said on X early Friday.

Microsoft didn’t respond immediately to a request for comment.

Frontier airlines

 

The outage forced low-cost airline Frontier to cancel some flights. “Our systems are currently impacted by a Microsoft outage, which is also affecting other companies,” Frontier said in a statement. “We appreciate your patience.” The carrier said it would offer refunds to affected passengers.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Frontier asked it to pause the airline’s departures across the U.S. Thursday night. The ground stop was later lifted. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It said it is “observing a positive trend in service availability” as it continues to mitigate the problem.

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Money

Netflix expands use of ads despite slow subscriber growth

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Netflix is intensifying its efforts to introduce an ad-supported tier amidst a plateau in subscriber growth.

The streaming giant hopes to attract new users and boost revenue by offering a cheaper alternative that includes advertisements.

This move marks a significant shift from its traditional ad-free model, reflecting Netflix’s response to competitive pressures and evolving consumer preferences.

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News

Tech researchers argue that ChatGPT’s AI comedy is beating humans to the punchline

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ChatGPT has taken to the stand-up stage, with some researchers arguing that AI has finally beaten humans to the punchline.

GenAI takes the next leap forward, now targeting the comedy scene – but will the machines get the last laugh?

Tom Finnigan from Talkingbrands.ai joins to discuss all the latest AI updates. #featured

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