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Why is Europe burning? Scientists link hot weather to climate change

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The Great European Heatwave continues, with thousands evacuated from Mediterranean communities as wildfires spread

A view shows smoke rising from the Gironde forest fires as seen from Landiras, France. Twitter @Dgamax

Strong winds in the south-west of France are frustrating efforts to contain a fire racing through pine forests.

14,000 people have been ordered to flee from the Gironde region, with this fire and another just south of Bordeaux destroying 10,000 hectares of land.

In southern Spain, 3,200 people have fled from their homes and the blazes are moving closer and closer towards popular tourist area, Málaga.

Portugal’s wildfires have now been extinguished, but 659 people have died from the extreme heat over the past week.

Fire season has hit Europe hard and fast this year, following an unusually dry and hot spring.

Britain’s Met Office issues first ever ‘red’ warning

In the UK, a red extreme heat warning has been issued for the first time in history.

A national emergency has been declared for areas including London, Manchester and York.

Reports suggest millions of workers will stay at home over the next 48 hours to escape the heatwave’s peak.

The extreme warning means there is a risk to life and authorities are urging residents to make changes to their daily routines in order to stay safe.

Speed restrictions are likely to be imposed for trains, while some schools will close early and hospital appointments cancelled.

The National Health Service (NHS) is also concerned there will be greater demand for ambulances, warning patients could left outside hospitals in emergency vehicles.

Experts believe the extreme temperatures Europe is currently facing can be attributed to climate change.

William is an Executive News Producer at TICKER NEWS, responsible for the production and direction of news bulletins. William is also the presenter of the hourly Weather + Climate segment. With qualifications in Journalism and Law (LLB), William previously worked at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) before moving to TICKER NEWS. He was also an intern at the Seven Network's 'Sunrise'. A creative-minded individual, William has a passion for broadcast journalism and reporting on global politics and international affairs.

Climate Change

Why ‘zombie viruses’ could be the next biggest public threat

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A new report reveals the world will see an increase in so-called ‘zombie viruses’ that are emerging beneath us

A new report by scientists at the French National Center for Scientific Research has revealed the global threat of ‘zombie viruses.’ As climate change continues to take effect, the earth is undeniably getter hotter.

Global warming essentially means significant areas of permafrost are now melting. Permafrost is a frozen layer on or under the Earth’s surface, holding beneath it millions of ‘zombie viruses’ not seen in millions of years.

The now melting permafrost means it is lifting the veil on potentially dangerous microbes that human kind isn’t prepared for.

In Siberia, the scientists uncovered a ‘zombie virus’ which they believe is 50,000 years old. This would be the oldest age of a frozen virus returning to life and able to infect.

Researchers are concerned about the global health impact if the earth continues to warm at its current rate.

 

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Climate Change

Australia warned to brace for more extreme weather events

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From wild floods, to raging fires. Australia has experienced it all

And that’s not changing anytime soon.

The country is getting warmer and residents are being warned to prepare for the worst.

From an increasing number of extreme heat days to flash flooding, wild bushfires and rising sea levels – the Bureau of Meteorology says we need to buckle up and brace for impact.

This comes as the New South Wales flood crisis is ranked as the most expensive natural disaster in Australia’s history.

$5.5 billion worth of insurance claims have been lodged right across the state and now residents as residents are being told their policies won’t be renewed.

So is there anything we can do and is there any hope for our environment?

Meanwhile, say goodbye to those cloudy skies – Weatherzone predicts Australia will flip from the current wet La Nina weather system to its hot and dry cousin, El Nino next year.

If this is true, residents can expect a long period of warm conditions, including reduced rainfall, warmer temperatures and less tropical cyclones.

So how likely is this prediction?

But don’t celebrate just yet.

While the weather system means more days to lie by the pool, spare a thought for those living amongst the trees.

As the risk of severe wildfires skyrockets.

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Climate Change

Climate change will force this country to enter the metaverse

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Tuvalu could become the first completely digitised country in the metaverse if climate change inaction continues

The low-lying Pacific nation of Tuvalu is currently experiencing the effects of rising sea levels like no other.

The country is home to nearly 12,000 people but climate change and rising sea levels could force the entire archipelago underwater in a matter of decades.

In fact, Tuvaluan lawmakers believe the country could become completely digitised in the metaverse as they seek to secure a future.

“As a progressive nation, we are excited at the opportunity for Tuvalu to exist in the metaverse—but not to the extent of losing our lands. The tragedy of this outcome cannot be overstated,” said Simon Kofe, who is the nation’s foreign affairs minister.

Mr Kofe addressed delegates of the COP27 climate summit in Egypt.

He said it is time world leaders looked towards alternative solutions to save his country.

“The world’s inaction means that our pacific region must take greater action and forge our own path as leaders on the international stage, but our action alone cannot stop the current trajectory of climate change.”

SIMON KOFE, FOREIGN MINISTER OF TUVALU


The small island nation has been asking world leaders to act and adhere to commitments made in the 2015 Paris Agreement.

“But because the world has not acted, we must. Tuvalu could be the first country in the
world to exist solely in cyberspace – but if global warming continues unchecked, it won’t be the last,” Mr Kofe said.

His speech highlighted the need for digital sovereignty to preserve Tuvalu’s culture, place, identity, and statehood.

A glimpse of what Tuvalu could look like in the metaverse.

The Tuvalu Government will build digital replicas of its nine atolls under the Future Now Project.

It will depict an accurate and virtual model of the real-world environment.

Documents, records of cultural practices, family albums and traditional songs are among those set to enter the metaverse.

The virtual-reality space allows users to interact with a computer-generated environment.

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