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One third of Pakistan under water following historic floods

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One third of Pakistan is under water following heavy rainfall

Historic floods in Pakistan have left 75 people dead over the past 24 hours, with the death toll expected to rise.

Pakistan’s climate minister, Sherry Rehman, describes the scene as “one big ocean…There’s no dry land to pump water out.”

Rehman says it’s a “crisis of unimaginable proportions” that has never been seen before, with up to 500,000 people displaced.

The dangerous floods have damaged homes, crops and roads. This has impacted the countries food resources and the ability for planes to arrive and depart.

Photo Credit: Al Jazeera

The Government says the record rainfall has been fuelled by worsening climate change and will appeal to the United Nations for urgent help.

Holly is an anchor and reporter at Ticker. She's experienced in live reporting, and has previously covered the Covid-19 pandemic on-location. She's passionate about telling stories in business, climate and health.

Climate Change

Hurricane Ian leaves a path of destruction

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Hurricane Ian leaves a path of destruction as clean-up begins

Hurricane Ian leaves a path of destruction as residents in the impacted areas begin picking up the pieces.

Searches are continuing in some of the hardest-hit regions of Florida.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Florida Task Force One members are conducting evacuation operations via helicopter.

The department said the area around Sanibel Island still remains inaccessible.

“Throughout the search and rescue operations, our crews encountered several elderly residents that needed to be evacuated from those areas that have sustained severe structural damage and have been only accessible by air rescue,” MDFR said in the release.

It added, “due to the inaccessibility, evacuations operations have been conducted via helicopters.

Assisted by the Florida National Guard and the United States Coast Guard, crews have been utilising a hoist to rescue and transport residents out of the island and into a safe zone in the mainland where they can receive medical attention.”

Ian weakened as it made its way northeast through Virginia.

The death toll stands at 78, with at least 74 people losing their lives in Florida and four in North Carolina.

U.S. President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill will now travel to Puerto Rico to assess the damage before moving onto Florida.

It comes as officials in Florida’s Lee County face growing questions over delayed mandatory evacuations when the storm first hit.

The Hurricane battered the states’ critical infrastructure.

Almost 800,000 customers in Florida and 10,000 in North Carolina remain without power.

Meanwhile, Orlando residents have been urged to conserve water after Ian damaged the city’s sewerage system.

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Climate Change

Hurricane Ian could be Florida’s deadliest storm

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Hurricane Ian could be Florida’s deadliest storm as it continues north towards South Carolina

U.S. President Joe Biden says Hurricane Ian could be the deadliest storm in the region’s history, with early reports suggesting substantial loss of life.

Biden spoke at an afternoon briefing at the headquarters of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (Fema).

Ian made landfall on Wednesday local time near the city of Fort Myers. It has led to severe flooding, high winds and storm surges.

Several areas remain submerged, and more than 2.5 million homes are without power.

Many residents are trapped in their homes and unable to escape. Search and rescue teams are working around the clock to provide assistance where they can.

5,000 Florida National Guard troops and 2,000 Guardsman from surrounding states have been deployed.

Eight teams with 800 members are carrying out search and rescue operations.

More than 200 public shelters have now been opened, housing around 34,000 people.

The National Hurricane Centre has downgraded Ian to a tropical storm for now but warns it will likely become a hurricane again later.

The entire coast of South Carolina is just the latest region to be placed on high alert as the storm continues north on its path of destruction.

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Climate Change

Hurricane Fiona intensifies as it heads for Canada

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Hurricane Fiona intensifies to a Category 4 storm

Hurricane Fiona has intensified to a Category 4 storm as it makes its way to Bermuda and Canada.

This follows the storm carving a destructive path through the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.

Here, wind gusts of up to 215 km per hour were recorded. The conditions triggered flash flooding and landslides.

So far, it has left at least eight people dead. Thousands of residents in affected areas have been left without access to basic services.

In Puerto Rico, 40 per cent of the island’s 3.3 million residents are still without power as rebuilding begins.

For many of these residents, the memory of Hurricane Maria back in just 2017 is still so real. 3,000 people died and the island was without power for a week following this storm.

Eric Blake is the acting branch chief for the NHC in Miami. He said Bermuda will see high surf, storm surges, heavy rainfall and powerful winds. This will be the case even if it keeps on its current path and passes to the west of the island.

It’s expected the storm will be at its worst by late Thursday.

“Hopefully, the core of the storm will stay west, but it could still jog east and hit Bermuda,” Blake said.

Fiona could reach Canada’s Atlantic coast by Friday.

 

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