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Meta’s plans to hide nudity from Instagram DMs

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Instagram, owned by Meta, announced plans to introduce features that will blur messages containing nudity in an effort to protect teenagers and prevent potential scammers from targeting them.

Meta’s decision comes amidst growing concerns regarding harmful content on its platforms, especially concerning the mental well-being of young users.

The technology giant has faced increasing scrutiny in both the United States and Europe, with accusations that its apps contribute to addiction and exacerbate mental health issues among adolescents.

According to Meta, the new protection feature for Instagram’s direct messages will utilise on-device machine learning to analyse whether an image sent through the service contains nudity.

This feature will be enabled by default for users under the age of 18, with adults being encouraged to activate it as well.

Meta said that because the image analysis occurs on the device itself, the nudity protection feature will function even in end-to-end encrypted chats, where Meta does not have access to the content unless it is reported by users.

unsplash_image @ Unsplash

Direct messages

Unlike Meta’s Messenger and WhatsApp apps, direct messages on Instagram are not currently encrypted.

However, Meta has stated its intention to implement encryption for Instagram’s direct messages in the future.

Additionally, Meta revealed that it is developing technology to identify accounts potentially involved in sextortion scams. The company is also testing new pop-up messages to alert users who may have interacted with such accounts.

This latest move follows Meta’s announcement in January that it would restrict more content from teens on Facebook and Instagram, aiming to reduce their exposure to sensitive topics such as suicide, self-harm, and eating disorders.

Meta’s efforts to enhance safety measures come amid legal challenges and regulatory scrutiny.

Attorneys general from 33 U.S. states, including California and New York, filed a lawsuit against the company in October, alleging repeated misrepresentation of the dangers associated with its platforms.

Ahron Young is an award winning journalist who has covered major news events around the world. Ahron is the Managing Editor and Founder of TICKER NEWS.

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Can big tech be trusted to use AI ethically?

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Big tech giants like Google, Microsoft, and IBM announced comprehensive plans to enhance AI safety measures – but is that enough to convince the everyday worker?

On this episode of Ahron & Mike Live – Can big tech be trusted with AI? “The Fall Guy” takes a hard hit, Apple’s Top Ten controversy and a robot performs surgery on a piece of corn.

Ticker’s Ahron Young & Mike Loder discuss. #featured

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OpenAI terminates AI risk protection team

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Less than a year after its inception, OpenAI has made the decision to dissolve its team dedicated to researching long-term risks associated with AI.

The team, formed with the intention of studying and mitigating potential risks stemming from advanced AI systems, was a notable part of OpenAI’s broader mission to ensure that AI is developed and used responsibly.

Dr Karen Sutherland from University of the Sunshine Coast #featured

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What are the biggest takeaways from the Second global AI summit?

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Top executives from leading tech companies committed to prioritising safety in the development and deployment of artificial intelligence technologies at the Second Global AI Summit.

During the summit, representatives from major corporations such as Google, Microsoft, and IBM outlined specific measures they will take to ensure that AI systems are developed and deployed responsibly.

Tom Finnigan from Talkingbrands.ai joins to discuss. #featured #trending

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