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Leading CEO spearheads support for cancer research & tech

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In the fight against cancer, funding for early-stage researchers and early-stage biotechnology is critical

Leading CEO of Cure Brain Cancer Foundation, Lance Kawaguchi, is spearheading support for new innovation to beat cancer.

Kawaguchi firmly believes that there must be more support for early-stage researchers and early-stage biotechnology. He knows that solving this problem can ultimately change the way cancer is approached.

“I wanted to make sure we can change the paradigm, so we can get money to treatments and also to researchers as quick as possible.”

lance kawaguchi, ceo, cure brain cancer foundation

Leading experts collaborate on cancer cure mission

Ticker’s Holly Stearnes sat down with Kawaguchi, alongside Professor Webster Cavenee and Dr. Alfred Yung. Together, they spoke about the importance of funding for early-stage researchers and early-stage biotechnology.

Cavenee is the Chairperson of our Scientific Advisory Committee & Director at the Ludwig Cancer Research, San Diego.

He has fundamentally changed the way scientists think about the onset of cancer and its progression. 

Yung is an integral part of Neuro-Oncology at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. He is an expert in clinical research and treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

Yung is also a 17-year cancer survivor and was recently named to the Blue Ribbon panel of experts selected to advise the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot.

Investing in early-stage researchers

Researchers are an integral part of the fight against all cancers. They work tirelessly to find a cure or treatment to ensure a better outcome for those who have fallen victim to the disease.

However, far too often, many early-career researchers miss out on critical funding to enhance and enable their remarkable work.

Many early-stage researchers are exposed to discrimination in the industry and frequently denied access to grants. Instead, grants are mostly given to late-career researchers.

The hierarchy in the industry means that up and coming researchers and some of the best minds in the world regularly get overlooked.

However, these minds and fresh ideas are the key to trying new innovations and potentially a cure for a disease that impacts millions of people every day.

The future depends on rising researchers and the innovation they bring.

Cure Brain Cancer Foundation is transforming the way cancer is approached and injecting much-needed awareness. Cancer is more than just a cause, it’s a movement.

“Researchers are the hardest working people. I want to make sure they have stability of funding… There’s a fundamental flaw in how we support early researchers.”

lance kawaguchi

Challenges for early-stage biotechnology

Biotechnology is the key to finding a cure for cancer. However, its innovative ideas don’t always make it to fruition because they face enormous setbacks within the industry.

Early-stage biotechs need funding to begin and continue to operate. The market in general is saturated and extremely hard to eventuate.

“We need to take a different lens… Where we can focus on the return on investment but also on the return on social impact.”

lance kawaguchi

Combatting early stages of a new biotechnology company can be difficult.

However, focusing on quality science, strategic management, securing funding, staffing, and regulatory compliance can increase the chances of success.  

“You can think about how cancer is investigated as if it’s a funnel… What we want to do is fill the funnel.

By that I mean new ideas, from multiple fields… We need to make the top of the funnel wider.”

Professor webster cavenee

Cancer knows no boundaries

Yung treated U.S. President Joe Biden’s oldest son, Beau Biden, before his death of brain cancer, aged 46.

Yung has been recognised by the Biden family, for his attempt to save Beau’s life.

The Biden administration launched the Cancer Moonshot’ initiative in a bid to halve the rate of cancer deaths by 2047. The President made mention of Yung when launching the initiative.

“See that doctor on the end there?

That’s the man who spent 18 months trying to save our son’s life. Doctor, I love you. The whole family loves you.”

Joe biden, u.s. President
(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trusting in CBCF

Lead by Kawaguchi, Cure Brain Cancer Foundation, is adding urgency to the fight against cancer.

They’re putting processes in place to give funding to early-stage researchers and early-stage biotechs, who have the ability to innovate the way cancer is approached.

Both Yung and Cavenee are highly respected in cancer research and have chosen to partner with Kawaguchi in his mission to find a cure for brain cancer.

“His keen interest on innovation and out of the box thinking… He is a move and shaker and it is a privilege to partner with him in this endeavour.”

Dr. Alfred yung

“Lance is on a mission for cancer patients, and that’s why I partnered with him.”

Professor webster cavenee

Holly is an anchor and reporter at Ticker. She's experienced in live reporting, and has previously covered the Covid-19 pandemic on-location. She's passionate about telling stories in business, climate and health.

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Leaders

The ‘invisible killers’ causing concern

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Companies and Governments are looking to turn awareness into action

The natural world is home to a diverse range of species that live in harmony with each other. However, the increasing use of pesticides, microplastics, and air pollution has been causing concerns about the impact on the environment and its inhabitants. These “silent killers” are threatening the delicate balance of the natural world, and the consequences could be catastrophic.

The concerns surrounding these “silent killers” highlight the need for greater awareness and action. Governments and industries are encouraged to take responsibility for their actions and work towards reducing their impact on the environment. Individuals can also play a role by making conscious decisions to reduce their use of pesticides, plastic products, and contributing to air pollution. Simple actions such as using organic products, reducing plastic use, and utilising alternative transportation can make a significant difference.

The Green Edition is presented by The ROOT Brands.For all media inquiries please get in touch here: tshuvah4u@yahoo.com

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How small businesses are using AI to fight back against big business

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AI demonstrates efficacy in capital acquisition within Australian startups.

One of the most impactful technology trends of 2024 is the proliferation of Artificial Intelligence tools.

One company is using AI to help founders raise capital for the next generation of game-changing innovation without the need for external human intervention.

To find out how it works, we’re joined by VentureCrowd CEO Steve Maarbani. #FUNDING FUTURES

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Leaders

Why somatic therapists are the missing piece in workplace wellbeing

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As organisations strive to enhance employee wellbeing, the emergence of somatic therapy presents a novel approach often overlooked.

Somatic therapy, a holistic approach that emphasises the connection between the mind and body, is gaining recognition for its profound impact on individual wellness.

Somatic therapists work with individuals to address physical sensations and emotions, promoting self-awareness and resilience.

Workplace wellbeing initiatives have often focused solely on physical health or mental wellness programs, overlooking the intricate interplay between the two.

This oversight is where somatic therapy steps in, bridging the gap by addressing both physical and psychological aspects concurrently.

Amanda Goodfellow, Director of Agile Mind, shares her personal insights on the benefits of somatic therapy. #business #health #workplace #therapy

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