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Chinese researchers plan on fighting asteroid apocalypse with rockets

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Chinese researchers want to send more than 20 of the country’s largest rockets to practise deflecting asteroids away from earth

A group of Chinese researchers want to send rockets into space to practise deflecting asteroids. The researchers say the technique may become crucial in the future if an asteroid ever goes on a collision course towards earth.

China isn’t the first country to trial using rockets to prevent asteroids from plummeting into earth. The US’ NASA also plans to launch a robotic spacecraft to intercept two asteroids late this year.

Our first attempt at changing the trajectory of a celestial body

The rocket will take about a year to crash-land on the asteroids. The aim is to see how much the asteroids’ trajectory changes.

Researchers at China’s National Space Science Center found that launching enough rockets at a large asteroid could alter its path. To be exact, 23 rockets could deflect a large asteroid from its original path by a distance 1.4 times the Earth’s radius.

Field view of Bennu’s surface from a NASA spacecraft. Credits: NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

Asteroids larger than 1km would have global consequences

Their calculations are based on a huge asteroid orbiting the sun called Bennu. Scientists have classified Bennu as being large enough to cause ‘regional or continental damage‘.

Current estimates show there is roughly a 1% chance a 100-metre-wide asteroid would strike Earth in the next 100 years, said Professor Gareth Collins at Imperial College London.

“Something the size of Bennu colliding is about 10 times less likely,” Collins said.

The ‘Bennu’ asteroid.

Natasha is an Associate Producer at ticker NEWS with a Bachelor of arts from Monash University. She has previously worked at Sky News Australia and Monash University as an Online Content Producer.

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Atari acquisition ends the longest running console war

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Atari, the iconic gaming company, has revealed its acquisition of the Intellivision brand.

‘Uniting Atari and Intellivision after 45 years ends the longest running console war in history,” said Mike Mika, Studio Head at Digital Eclipse, an Atari-owned game studio.

This move is seen as a strategic step by Atari to expand its portfolio and tap into the nostalgia-driven market.

Emily Leaney from TeamRetro joins to discuss. #featured

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The United States is accelerating efforts into space warfare

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Is space warfare the next frontier of military competition?

On this episode of Hot Shots – the US expand efforts into space warfare, big tech commit to AI fail safes, while AI moves the markets and a buried treasure of ‘Holy Grail’ proportions is unearthed.

Ticker’s Ahron Young & Veronica Dudo discuss. #featured #trending

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Are silent vehicles putting pedestrians at risk?

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A recent study suggests that EVs and hybrids are more likely to be involved in pedestrian collisions compared to traditional internal combustion engine vehicles.

One possible explanation for this phenomenon is the quieter operation of electric vehicles at lower speeds, which can catch pedestrians off guard, particularly those who are visually impaired or distracted.

To counter this issue, all new EVs in Australia will be outfitted with AVAS – an audible alert to pedestrians to indicate a EV is headed in their direction.

Mike Costello from Cox Automotive joins to discuss. #featured

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