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Three injured as tornado hits Australia’s New South Wales

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A small tornado has ripped through parts of Australia’s state of New South Wales

The tornado hit near the small town of Bathurst this afternoon, whipping up debris and damaging homes.

At least three people have been injured according to emergency officials.

Bureau of Metereology (BoM) senior climatologist Agata Imielska confirmed there was damage to houses and power lines north-east of Bathurst.

State Emergency Service officials and police are currently on the ground assessing the destruction

Imielska confirmed the tornado was part of a broader weather system that the BOM had been warning about for several days.

“We have a line of damage roughly 25 to 30 kilometres,”

Imielska said.

The system is moving across Australia’s east coast, and there are severe weather warnings are in place for large parts of NSW, including Sydney.

A man in his 40s has been taken to hospital with minor injuries.

Anthony Lucas is reporter, presenter and social media producer with ticker News. Anthony holds a Bachelor of Professional Communication, with a major in Journalism from RMIT University as well as a Diploma of Arts and Entertainment journalism from Collarts. He’s previously worked for 9 News, ONE FM Radio and Southern Cross Austerio’s Hit Radio Network. 

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Nord Stream pipe attack “acts of sabotage”

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The US State Department has described recent leaks in the Nord Stream gas pipelines as “apparent acts of sabotage”

U.S State Department spokesperson Ned Price says they have more questions than answers at this point.

Adding Secretary of State Antony Blinken will begin discussing the issue with European counterparts as soon as Wednesday.

Price confirmed the leak “impacts Europe’s broader energy security and energy resilience”.

When was pressed on whether sabotage would rise to the level of a breach of NATO Article 5, he declined to speculate.

But noted the investigation could take some time.

It comes as European countries ramp up their military presence at oil and gas facilities, following the Nord Stream incident.

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Russia is about to annex Ukraine, so what happens next?

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Moscow is about to annex a swath of Ukraine, releasing what it called vote tallies showing support in four partially occupied provinces to join Russia.

It looks like Russia is poised to annex a large chunk of Ukraine.

This comes after so-called referendums were held in four occupied provinces, which showed overwhelming support for joining Russia.

Of course, these referendums were anything but legitimate. They were held at gunpoint and were widely denounced by Kyiv and the West as sham votes.

“They can announce anything they want. Nobody voted in the referendum except a few people who switched sides. They went from house to house but nobody came out,” said Lyubomir Boyko, 43, from Golo Pristan, a village in Russian-occupied Kherson province.

People attend a rally and a concert in support of annexation referendums in Russian-held regions of Ukraine, in Saint Petersburg on September 23, 2022. 

Moscow takes charge

Nevertheless, it looks like Moscow is moving ahead with its plans to absorb these Ukrainian regions. A tribune has been set up on Red Square, with giant video screens proclaiming “Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, Kherson – Russia!”

The Russian-installed administrations of the four Ukrainian provinces on Wednesday formally asked Putin to incorporate them into Russia, which Russian officials have suggested is a formality.

“The results are clear. Welcome home, to Russia!,” Dmitry Medvedev, a former president who serves as deputy chairman of Russia’s Security Council, said on Telegram.

It’s expected that President Vladimir Putin will give a speech within days confirming the annexation. This would mean that, in just over a week, Putin has gone from endorsing the sham referendums to formalizing the annexation of Ukrainian territory.

This latest development is sure to increase tensions between Russia and the West. It also further diminishes the chances of a peaceful resolution to the conflict in Ukraine.

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EU sees Nord Stream gas pipeline leaks as ‘a deliberate act’

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European countries are investigating two Russian gas pipelines that have leaked into the baltic sea near Denmark and Sweden

The Nord Stream carries gas from Russia to the rest of Europe.

Governments around Europe are being cautious to not rule out sabotage… as evidence so far suggests it has been physically damaged.

But U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken says it would be ‘in no-one’s interest’ to damage this essential energy source.

The leaks have led Denmark to restrict shipping in a five nautical mile radius…. while in Sweden, the country’s prime minister says the leaks are seen as deliberate acts.

In Moscow, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters “No option can be ruled out right now.”

Both pipelines have been crucial talking points in an escalating energy war between Europe and Moscow.

It’s sent gas prices soaring around the world as countries race to find alternative energy sources.

Nord Stream itself says “its not possible to estimate a timeframe” to fix the leaks.

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