Connect with us
https://tickernews.co/wp-content/uploads/2023/10/AmEx-Thought-Leaders.jpg

Tech

Push to ban every Australian from buying petrol-powered cars

Published

on

A new report suggests banning the sale of petrol and diesel vehicles across Australia by 2035.

The report, released by the Climate Council in collaboration with the University of Technology Sydney, outlines ambitious measures to slash transport emissions by half before 2030.

The report, titled “Seize the Decade,” not only proposes the ban on internal combustion engine vehicles but also recommends encouraging households to transition to electric vehicles (EVs) and reducing the number of family cars.

It advocates for greater electrification of taxi, ride-share, and government fleet vehicles, alongside improvements in public transport infrastructure and cycling facilities.

According to the study, these measures could significantly cut pollution levels and deliver substantial health benefits earlier than anticipated.

By implementing changes in transportation habits, emissions could drop from an estimated 94.6 megatonnes to 45.3 megatonnes by 2030.

FILE PHOTO: Anthony Albanese, Australia’s Prime Minister.

Heavy trucks

Among the recommended actions are yearly increases in rates of walking, cycling, and public transport usage, alongside ensuring that at least one in three government agency, taxi, and ride-share vehicles are electric.

The report also suggests that electric heavy trucks should constitute 17 percent of vehicles on Australian roads, with one third of road freight transitioning to rail.

Furthermore, the report calls for federal and state governments to offer financial incentives for households to replace one of their petrol cars and set a firm deadline for the end of petrol and diesel vehicle sales, no later than 2035. This aligns with similar initiatives in the European Union, Canada, UK, and some US states, as well as the Australian Capital Territory’s plan to halt new combustion engine sales by 2035.

Dr. Kate Charlesworth, a volunteer with the Climate Council, said the potential for significant reductions in transport pollution through simple adjustments in household vehicle usage.

She highlighted the need for a societal shift towards electric and shared transportation options, saying the benefits not only for the environment but also for public health and household finances.

The report’s recommendations come on the heels of the federal government’s unveiling of a fuel-efficiency standard aimed at reducing emissions from new vehicles by 60 percent for passenger cars and 50 percent for light commercial vehicles by 2029.

This standard, slated for implementation in January 2025, represents a significant step towards addressing Australia’s transport emissions.

Ahron Young is an award winning journalist who has covered major news events around the world. Ahron is the Managing Editor and Founder of TICKER NEWS.

Continue Reading

News

Are silent vehicles putting pedestrians at risk?

Published

on

A recent study suggests that EVs and hybrids are more likely to be involved in pedestrian collisions compared to traditional internal combustion engine vehicles.

One possible explanation for this phenomenon is the quieter operation of electric vehicles at lower speeds, which can catch pedestrians off guard, particularly those who are visually impaired or distracted.

To counter this issue, all new EVs in Australia will be outfitted with AVAS – an audible alert to pedestrians to indicate a EV is headed in their direction.

Mike Costello from Cox Automotive joins to discuss. #featured

Continue Reading

News

Can big tech be trusted to use AI ethically?

Published

on

Big tech giants like Google, Microsoft, and IBM announced comprehensive plans to enhance AI safety measures – but is that enough to convince the everyday worker?

On this episode of Ahron & Mike Live – Can big tech be trusted with AI? “The Fall Guy” takes a hard hit, Apple’s Top Ten controversy and a robot performs surgery on a piece of corn.

Ticker’s Ahron Young & Mike Loder discuss. #featured

Continue Reading

News

OpenAI terminates AI risk protection team

Published

on

Less than a year after its inception, OpenAI has made the decision to dissolve its team dedicated to researching long-term risks associated with AI.

The team, formed with the intention of studying and mitigating potential risks stemming from advanced AI systems, was a notable part of OpenAI’s broader mission to ensure that AI is developed and used responsibly.

Dr Karen Sutherland from University of the Sunshine Coast #featured

Continue Reading

Trending Now