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Instagram’s new ‘Take a Break’ feature revealed

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Instagram has announced new features that the social platform says will help teenagers and parents manage time spent on the app

Instagram has announced the new feature called ‘Take a Break,’ where parents will be able to see how much time their children spend on Instagram and set time limits. Teens will also get notifications, reminding them to take a break.

It comes a day before Instagram chief Adam Mosseri is due to appear before US Senators investigating online safety.

Instagram has been under increasing pressure over teens’ use of the platform in recent months.

Frances Haugen sparks action

Parent company Meta’s internal research suggested that teens blamed Instagram for increased anxiety was the first in a series of revelations in France Haugen’s leaked documents from inside Facebook.

The US Senate Committee is expected to quiz Mr Mosseri on Instagram’s internal information on child safety and its plans – as well as what the committee calls “potential legislative solutions”.

HANOVER, GERMANY – JUNE 12: The Instagram and Facebook logos are displayed at the 2018 CeBIT technology trade fair on June 12, 2018 in Hanover, Germany. The 2018 CeBIT is running from June 11-15.

Take a break feature unveiled

In his blog post on Insta, Mr Mosseri announced the launch of the “take-a-break” feature, which he had tweeted about in November.

The new feature will be launched on Tuesday in the United Kingdom, Ireland, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, he said.

“If someone has been scrolling for a certain amount of time, we’ll ask them to take a break from Instagram and suggest that they set reminders to take more breaks in the future,” Mr Mosseri wrote.

Mosseri said the feature would also show them tips from experts to “help them reflect and reset”

Anthony Lucas is reporter, presenter and social media producer with ticker News. Anthony holds a Bachelor of Professional Communication, with a major in Journalism from RMIT University as well as a Diploma of Arts and Entertainment journalism from Collarts. He’s previously worked for 9 News, ONE FM Radio and Southern Cross Austerio’s Hit Radio Network. 

Business

It’s Musk v Twitter in tech war

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A war has broken out between Elon Musk in his battle against Apple.

In a tweet, owner Musk says Apple may ban Twitter from the App store, which would be devastating for his company, and wonders if it has to do with free speech. He even tagged Apple boss Tim Cook.

Musk says: “Apple has threatened to withhold Twitter from its App Store, but won’t tell us why.”

This all comes in the wake of other organisations allegedly following Apple’s suit and cutting back their advertising spending since the $44 billion Musk takeover.

General Mills and Pfizer have been two companies that have gone down this path and diverted their spending elsewhere.

Right now users can still see ads in their Twitter feeds.

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Tech

Porn floods Twitter “China” search

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Twitter users have been finding it hard to search for information on the social media platform due to an explosion of pornographic spam.

While thousands of protests against extended lockdowns, a digital bot army has roared into action on Twitter, with long-dormant Chinese language accounts suddenly tweeting links to escort services and other adult content.

Anyone trying to track the spontaneous protest movement on Twitter complained about the deluge of spam pornographic content making flooding the search for information.

The China protests come at a time when Twitter’s content and moderation teams have been pared back drastically following Elon Musk’s $44 billion takeover of the social media giant.

Twitter, along with other international social media services like Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram, is blocked by Beijing’s internet censors within Mainland China.

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Business

British lawmakers want to fine social media

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Social media companies could be fined if they don’t remove harmful content, according to a new plan from the UK Government

Lawmakers want to make it illegal to encourage users to harm themselves online.

It’s part of a crackdown on online behaviour on content that leads to self harm.

In a statement, Digital Secretary Michelle Donelan said these firms “can no longer remain silent bystanders”.

She says they’ll face fines for allowing this abusive and destructive behaviour to continue on their platforms.”

It follows the death of Molly Russell in 20-17, which sparked concern for harmful content online.

A coroner ruled social media platforms fed her content that “romanticised acts of self-harm”.

Sexually explicit materials will also be banned under the new policy.

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