Connect with us

Climate Change

Climate change will force this country to enter the metaverse

Published

on

Tuvalu could become the first completely digitised country in the metaverse if climate change inaction continues

The low-lying Pacific nation of Tuvalu is currently experiencing the effects of rising sea levels like no other.

The country is home to nearly 12,000 people but climate change and rising sea levels could force the entire archipelago underwater in a matter of decades.

In fact, Tuvaluan lawmakers believe the country could become completely digitised in the metaverse as they seek to secure a future.

“As a progressive nation, we are excited at the opportunity for Tuvalu to exist in the metaverse—but not to the extent of losing our lands. The tragedy of this outcome cannot be overstated,” said Simon Kofe, who is the nation’s foreign affairs minister.

Mr Kofe addressed delegates of the COP27 climate summit in Egypt.

He said it is time world leaders looked towards alternative solutions to save his country.

“The world’s inaction means that our pacific region must take greater action and forge our own path as leaders on the international stage, but our action alone cannot stop the current trajectory of climate change.”

SIMON KOFE, FOREIGN MINISTER OF TUVALU


The small island nation has been asking world leaders to act and adhere to commitments made in the 2015 Paris Agreement.

“But because the world has not acted, we must. Tuvalu could be the first country in the
world to exist solely in cyberspace – but if global warming continues unchecked, it won’t be the last,” Mr Kofe said.

His speech highlighted the need for digital sovereignty to preserve Tuvalu’s culture, place, identity, and statehood.

A glimpse of what Tuvalu could look like in the metaverse.

The Tuvalu Government will build digital replicas of its nine atolls under the Future Now Project.

It will depict an accurate and virtual model of the real-world environment.

Documents, records of cultural practices, family albums and traditional songs are among those set to enter the metaverse.

The virtual-reality space allows users to interact with a computer-generated environment.

Costa is a news producer at ticker NEWS. He has previously worked as a regional journalist at the Southern Highlands Express newspaper. He also has several years' experience in the fire and emergency services sector, where he has worked with researchers, policymakers and local communities. He has also worked at the Seven Network during their Olympic Games coverage and in the ABC Melbourne newsroom. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts (Professional), with expertise in journalism, politics and international relations. His other interests include colonial legacies in the Pacific, counter-terrorism, aviation and travel.

Continue Reading

Climate Change

Why ‘zombie viruses’ could be the next biggest public threat

Published

on

A new report reveals the world will see an increase in so-called ‘zombie viruses’ that are emerging beneath us

A new report by scientists at the French National Center for Scientific Research has revealed the global threat of ‘zombie viruses.’ As climate change continues to take effect, the earth is undeniably getter hotter.

Global warming essentially means significant areas of permafrost are now melting. Permafrost is a frozen layer on or under the Earth’s surface, holding beneath it millions of ‘zombie viruses’ not seen in millions of years.

The now melting permafrost means it is lifting the veil on potentially dangerous microbes that human kind isn’t prepared for.

In Siberia, the scientists uncovered a ‘zombie virus’ which they believe is 50,000 years old. This would be the oldest age of a frozen virus returning to life and able to infect.

Researchers are concerned about the global health impact if the earth continues to warm at its current rate.

 

Continue Reading

Climate Change

Australia warned to brace for more extreme weather events

Published

on

From wild floods, to raging fires. Australia has experienced it all

And that’s not changing anytime soon.

The country is getting warmer and residents are being warned to prepare for the worst.

From an increasing number of extreme heat days to flash flooding, wild bushfires and rising sea levels – the Bureau of Meteorology says we need to buckle up and brace for impact.

This comes as the New South Wales flood crisis is ranked as the most expensive natural disaster in Australia’s history.

$5.5 billion worth of insurance claims have been lodged right across the state and now residents as residents are being told their policies won’t be renewed.

So is there anything we can do and is there any hope for our environment?

Meanwhile, say goodbye to those cloudy skies – Weatherzone predicts Australia will flip from the current wet La Nina weather system to its hot and dry cousin, El Nino next year.

If this is true, residents can expect a long period of warm conditions, including reduced rainfall, warmer temperatures and less tropical cyclones.

So how likely is this prediction?

But don’t celebrate just yet.

While the weather system means more days to lie by the pool, spare a thought for those living amongst the trees.

As the risk of severe wildfires skyrockets.

Continue Reading

Climate Change

A billionaire emits a million times more emissions than the average person

Published

on

A new study reveals a billionaire emits a million times more greenhouse gases than the everyday person

A new study by British charity Oxfam has found a billionaire emits a million times more greenhouse gases than the average person.

The study looked at the investments of around 125 of the wealthiest people in the world.

The final data reveals their investments produce over 3 millions tonnes of carbon dioxide per person.

The study blames billionaires’ lavish lifestyles, like their private jets and yachts for the skyrocketing emissions.

A few of the billionaires’ emissions combined equals the carbon footprint of an entire country.

Continue Reading

Trending Now

Copyright © 2022 The Ticker Company PTY LTD