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Children 5-11 to receive Pfizer COVID vaccine in U.S.

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The United States will begin inoculating children aged between 5 to 11 with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

A recent recommendation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stated shots of the Pfizer COVID vaccine can start being inoculated into children aged 5 to 11 from next week.

The White House has welcomed the news, enlisting 20,000 health care workers to help support the process and also shipped around 15 million doses ahead of the decision.

The CDC’s Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky says this decision signifies a “momentous day” for the country with the Pfizer jab being the first pediatric COVID-19 vaccine authorised for use in the States.

CDC approves Pfizer for 5-11 year olds. / Image: [Shawn Rocco/Duke University/Handout via Reuters]

Children will get two injections, given 21 days apart

But the vaccine will be given at a lower dosage – one third of the amount provided to teenagers and adults.

Some parents have been counting down the minutes until American regulators clear the vaccine for children, so that it can bring them back to “normal” in person education, as well as sports and other extracurricular activities that have been put on hold due to the pandemic.

Children are generally less likely than adults to suffer from severe cases of Covid, according to the CDC.

The agency revealed at least 2,316 kids ages 5 to 11 have suffered from multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, known as MIS-C – a rare but serious Covid-related complication, according to data shared by the CDC at the meeting.

CDC advisor Dr. Matthew Daley said there have been at least 2 million COVID cases in the age group, 8,300 hospitalisations and at least 94 deaths.

Pfizer COVID vaccine to be provided to children aged 5 to 11 in the US from next week. Image: File

FDA modelling for benefits of vaccinating children:

Fully vaccinating 1 million kids ages 5 to 11 would prevent 58,000 Covid infections, 241 hospitalisations, 77 intensive care unit stays and one death, according to a modeled scenario published by the Food and Drug Administration last week.

Up to 106 kids would suffer from vaccine-induced myocarditis but most would recover, according to the agency.

Anthony Lucas is reporter, presenter and social media producer with ticker News. Anthony holds a Bachelor of Professional Communication, with a major in Journalism from RMIT University as well as a Diploma of Arts and Entertainment journalism from Collarts. He’s previously worked for 9 News, ONE FM Radio and Southern Cross Austerio’s Hit Radio Network. 

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How close to a full scale nuclear war are we really?

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Since President Vladimir Putin’s latest warning that he is ready to use nuclear weapons to defend Russia, the question of whether or not the former KGB spy is bluffing has become much more urgent.

There are several reasons why Putin’s nuclear warnings have the West worried. First, Russia has been increasingly aggressive in its actions in recent years, from annexing Crimea to intervening in Syria. This has led to a feeling that Putin is becoming more and more reckless and unpredictable.

Second, Russia has been beefing up its nuclear arsenal, with reports indicating that it now has more nuclear warheads than any other country in the world. This increase in firepower makes Putin’s threats all the more credible.

Last but not least, there is the fact that Putin is a former KGB agent. This means that he is no stranger to playing games of brinkmanship and bluffing. In the past, he has used nuclear threats as a way to get what he wants. For example, in 2008, he threatened to aim nuclear missiles at European cities unless the United States agreed to drop plans for a missile defense system in Eastern Europe.

The West is worried

Given all of this, it’s no wonder that Putin’s latest nuclear threats have the West worried. Only Putin knows if he is actually bluffing, but given his track record, it’s certainly a possibility.

If a nuclear weapon were used in Ukraine, it would cause a massive humanitarian crisis. Tens of thousands of people would be killed or wounded, and millions more would be displaced. The economic and social damage would be enormous, and Europe would be plunged into chaos.

In addition, the use of nuclear weapons would also have devastating consequences for the rest of the world. The nuclear non-proliferation regime would be dealt a serious blow, and there would be a renewed risk of nuclear war.

The world would become a much more dangerous place.

Nuclear impact

A nuclear explosion in Ukraine would have a regional impact, but it could also have global consequences. The use of nuclear weapons would violate the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and this could lead to other countries acquiring nuclear weapons. In addition, the risk of nuclear war would increase, and this would have a negative impact on the entire world.

The UN has condemned Russia’s threats of nuclear war, and it has called on all parties to refrain from any actions that could lead to the use of nuclear weapons. The UN Secretary-General has said that there can be no military solution to the crisis in Ukraine, and he has urged all sides to return to the negotiating table.

Russia has several allies in its war against Ukraine. These include Belarus, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan. Russia also has the support of China and Iran.

The war in Ukraine has had a significant impact on energy prices.

Due to the conflict, there has been a disruption in the supply of natural gas and oil from Ukraine. This has led to an increase in prices for these commodities.

The West can only threaten Putin further, as they’ve done all year, since President Biden warned that Russia was about to invade Ukraine.

Every step of the way, Putin has done exactly what the West has feared.

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Suicide bombing rocks an education facility in Afghanistan

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At least 19 people are dead following a suicide bombing in Kabul

A blast at the Kaaj education centre in the Dashte Barchi area has claimed the lives of at least 19 Afghans.

Local reports suggest students were taking a university exam at the time of the attack.

The area is a busy place for the Hazara minority, who have been targeted in recent attacks.

Police are at the scene as investigations continue. At this time, no group has claimed responsibility for the attack.

A string of violence has plagued Kabul in recent weeks, which has claimed the lives of dozens.

The U.S. withdrawal saw the Taliban returned to power in Afghanistan last August.

The Taliban has previously said it is seeking to restore stability. But rival Islamists have continued to plague the country.

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Judge sides with Trump in Mar-a-Lago investigation

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A United States Federal Judge has sided with former President Donald Trump amid the ongoing Mar-a-Lago investigation

In a move that will likely come as a relief to Donald Trump, a federal judge has ruled that the former president does not have to provide a sworn declaration regarding claims the FBI “planted” evidence in his Mar-a-Lago resort.

Previously, Trump had been required to provide the declaration as part of the review process for the investigation.

But Judge Aileen Cannon, who is overseeing the Mar-a-Lago investigation, has now pushed back several key deadlines, extending the final date of completion from November to December.

“There shall be no separate requirement on Plaintiff at this stage, prior to the review of any of the Seized Materials, to lodge ex ante final objections to the accuracy of Defendant’s Inventory, its descriptions, or its contents.”

Judge Aileen cannon
Judge Aileen Cannon & Donald Trump

This means that Trump will not have to confirm, under oath, his recent claims the FBI manufactured evidence against him

These are assertions which could be used against him if he is charged with any crimes.

Trump’s lawyers had argued that the president should not be required to provide a declaration, and it seems Judge Cannon has sided with them.

For now, Trump will not have to put his claims on the record.

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