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Amazon limits sale of morning-after pills following Roe v. Wade abortion decision

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Amazon has limited sales of morning-after pills as demand spikes following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling overturning abortion rights

There’s now a limit of three Plan-B units per week on emergency contraceptive pills sold through its website.

They aren’t the first to limit pills, many U.S retailers are capping purchases of emergency contraceptive pills.

Demand has surged following last week’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade and ending the constitutional right to have an abortion.

Social media is flooding with calls to stock up on Plan B in anticipation of possible restrictions on contraceptive pills.

Amazon is one of several retailers to put curbs on morning after pills

A review of emergency contraceptive pills sold on Amazon showed varying quantity limits. 

A listing for Plan B, a popular brand of the drug Levonorgestrel, showed purchases were capped at three products per shopper.

Meanwhile, one listing for a generic version of the drug, called My Choice, allowed users to purchase up to 30 units.

Walmart said many of the chain’s products have online purchase limits that can change “during times of fluctuating demand.”

Walgreens said purchases of emergency contraceptive pills were not being limited.

Emergency contraceptive pills, often referred to as “morning after pills” and sold under the Plan B brand, can be purchased over-the-counter and without an ID or prescription.

Tech

War in Ukraine collides with world of tech

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Russia’s largest social media app has been taken off Apple’s App store

VKontakte is a popular Russian social media app with millions of downloads.

The app’s users have been told the it will no longer be on the popular app store.

Other games made by the same developer have also been taken offline.

It’s unclear why the app has stopped showing online.

But many western companies have left Russia themselves, including Nike and McDonalds in the wake of President Putin’s war in Ukraine.

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Business

Optusdata hacker mocked on social media for clumsy attack

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Hackers are having a field day mocking the “Optusdata” hacker who stole the personal information of more than 10 million Australians.

The hapless hacker made the mistake of demanding a $1.5 million ransom from Optus, and then apologised when they didn’t get their way.

Now they’re being ridiculed by the very people they were trying to impress.

“This just goes to show that you can’t trust any optusdata these days,” said one commenter on an online forum. “They’ll steal your data and then humiliate you for it.”

“I wouldn’t give them a cent,” said another. “They don’t deserve it.”

Millions impacted

The company has downplayed the incident, saying that only a small percentage of its customers’ data was actually stolen.

“We would like to reassure our customers that their data is safe and secure,” an Optus spokesperson said. “We have robust security measures in place to protect our customers’ information.”

If you’re an Optus customer, you can check to see if your data was stolen by going to optusdata.com.au/hackcheck

You should also change your password and be on the lookout for any suspicious activity on your account.

If you’re worried about your data, you should change your password and be on the lookout for any suspicious activity on your account.

Optus has downplayed the incident, saying that only a small percentage of its customers’ data was actually stolen. However, the company is still urging customers to take precautions.

Government action

The Albanese government has said that it is “deeply concerned” about the hack and is working with Optus to investigate the matter.

“We take the security of our citizens’ data very seriously,” a spokesperson for the Albanese government said.

“This incident highlights the need for all businesses to have robust security measures in place to protect their customers’ information.”

The Albanese government is urging all businesses to review their security measures in light of the Optus hack.

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Optus hack – which businesses are at the highest risk of hacks?

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A hacker has threatened to release the private information of millions of Optus customers, this includes passports, medicare numbers, drivers licenses and banking information

If you’re one of the millions of Australians affected by the recent Optus data breach, you may be wondering what to do next.

Fortunately, the government has announced that Optus will be footing the bill for anyone who needs to change their driver’s licence number and get a new card.

This process is expected to cost the telco millions of dollars.

In the meantime, if you are concerned about your identity being compromised, experts recommend taking steps to protect yourself such as monitoring your credit report and changing your passwords and identity documents.

Optus has also set up a dedicated hotline for customers who want to know more about the data breach and what it means for them.

The hacker claimed to have accessed Optus customer names, addresses, dates of birth, driver’s licence numbers and credit.

They demanded a $1m ransom in cryptocurrency and threatened to release the data otherwise.

Now, they claim the data has been deleted, but there is no proof of this.

Can the hacker be found?

Susie Jones, Chief Executive at Cynch Security says it can be incredibly difficult to find cybercriminals “which is why it’s such a large market these days unfortunately.”

However, the the actions that they’re taking “certainly does indicate that they’re getting cold feet and certainly becoming a lot more nervous about the attention”.

“So whilst the pessimist cyber CEO hitting me says that they won’t be found. The optimistic Australian certainly hope they will be,” Susie says.

How long do people have to worry about hackers using their stolen ID information?

Good news – It’s not too late.

“The first step that they should be doing is really remaining vigilant and making sure that they’re scrutinising all of their bank accounts, all of their phone records, making sure that they’re really staying on top of what it is that is going on in their accounts and their personal data and personal lives,” Susie says.

“Being very, very careful around scam phone calls and emails. cyber attackers are very good at that now and they will be actively exploiting this opportunity.”

Susie says to make sure that you’re remaining vigilant and stay on top of what the latest scams are, so that you can spot them and delete them straight away.

Optus is in the business of dealing with people’s data and tech as one of Australia’s largest telco’s – what businesses are at the highest risk of ransomeware attacks?

“Businesses of every size, doesn’t matter if you’re a sole trader right up to the likes of Optus, are actively being attacked by cyber criminals every minute of every day.”

“But that’s just a reality. What this does do is raise awareness that personal data that is this is collect, even if it might seem small to yourself, and to the likes of hope this can be incredibly valuable and also from hands can be very, very damaging,” Susie says.

“So for those businesses that are not having to respond directly to this attack, they should be actively reviewing their own processes reviewing what personal information do they collect and store and making sure that they’re keeping it safe.

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