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Climate Change

New Zealand to tax farmers for their cow and sheep burps

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Better out than in except for when you’re in New Zealand where they’ve found an interesting way to tackle climate change

Farmers will soon be forced to pay taxes for sheep and cattle burps making the island nation the first to impose taxes on methane emissions produced by animals.

Agriculture contributes to almost half of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions with the country housing about 10 million cattle and 26 million sheep.

The country’s government has been previously criticised for not including agricultural emissions in the nation’s emissions trading scheme.

New Zealand’s climate change minister James Shaw says “There is no question” that the country needs to “cut the amount of methane” they are putting into the atmosphere, and an effective emissions pricing system for agriculture will play a key part in that.

The proposal will mean farmers will have to pay for their gas emissions from 2025.

But there are some farmers could benefit if they choose to lower emissions through feed additives and plant trees on farms.

Natasha is an Associate Producer at ticker NEWS with a Bachelor of arts from Monash University. She has previously worked at Sky News Australia and Monash University as an Online Content Producer.

Business

Rolls Royce CEO slams aviation for failing on climate targets

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Aviation needs to act on net-zero targets, that’s according to the CEO of Rolls Royce

Warren East says the sector needs to move towards bio-fuels like hydrogen and electric aircraft.

Travellers can even look forward to flying on planes that has a gas turbine that’s burning hydrogen.

Speaking at a conference in London, East says transitional technology is the answer that plane-makers are searching for.

Some companies are already looking at sustainable fuels that can offer 80 per cent off carbon emissions across their lifetime.

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Climate Change

Hurricane Ian leaves a path of destruction

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Hurricane Ian leaves a path of destruction as clean-up begins

Hurricane Ian leaves a path of destruction as residents in the impacted areas begin picking up the pieces.

Searches are continuing in some of the hardest-hit regions of Florida.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Florida Task Force One members are conducting evacuation operations via helicopter.

The department said the area around Sanibel Island still remains inaccessible.

“Throughout the search and rescue operations, our crews encountered several elderly residents that needed to be evacuated from those areas that have sustained severe structural damage and have been only accessible by air rescue,” MDFR said in the release.

It added, “due to the inaccessibility, evacuations operations have been conducted via helicopters.

Assisted by the Florida National Guard and the United States Coast Guard, crews have been utilising a hoist to rescue and transport residents out of the island and into a safe zone in the mainland where they can receive medical attention.”

Ian weakened as it made its way northeast through Virginia.

The death toll stands at 78, with at least 74 people losing their lives in Florida and four in North Carolina.

U.S. President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill will now travel to Puerto Rico to assess the damage before moving onto Florida.

It comes as officials in Florida’s Lee County face growing questions over delayed mandatory evacuations when the storm first hit.

The Hurricane battered the states’ critical infrastructure.

Almost 800,000 customers in Florida and 10,000 in North Carolina remain without power.

Meanwhile, Orlando residents have been urged to conserve water after Ian damaged the city’s sewerage system.

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Climate Change

Hurricane Ian could be Florida’s deadliest storm

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Hurricane Ian could be Florida’s deadliest storm as it continues north towards South Carolina

U.S. President Joe Biden says Hurricane Ian could be the deadliest storm in the region’s history, with early reports suggesting substantial loss of life.

Biden spoke at an afternoon briefing at the headquarters of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (Fema).

Ian made landfall on Wednesday local time near the city of Fort Myers. It has led to severe flooding, high winds and storm surges.

Several areas remain submerged, and more than 2.5 million homes are without power.

Many residents are trapped in their homes and unable to escape. Search and rescue teams are working around the clock to provide assistance where they can.

5,000 Florida National Guard troops and 2,000 Guardsman from surrounding states have been deployed.

Eight teams with 800 members are carrying out search and rescue operations.

More than 200 public shelters have now been opened, housing around 34,000 people.

The National Hurricane Centre has downgraded Ian to a tropical storm for now but warns it will likely become a hurricane again later.

The entire coast of South Carolina is just the latest region to be placed on high alert as the storm continues north on its path of destruction.

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